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The Abolethic Sovereignty were the original aboleths of the Realms, who dwelt in the flying, obelisk-shaped city of Xxiphu, that has existed since prehistoric times.[1] The Abolethic Sovereignty originally came to Abeir-Toril when the world was young, when Xxiphu plummeted to the world and settled deep below what is now the Sea of Fallen Stars. The oldest-known aboleth and possibly the progenitor of the entire species, the Eldest, was an enormous creature that rested atop the city like a throne.[2] When Abeir-Toril was sundered into two twin planets, Abeir and Toril, the city of Xxiphu remained on Abeir.[1] During the Spellplague, Xxiphu was transported to Faerûn, and the members of the Abolethic Sovereignty took great interest in the world of Toril.[3]

The main goal of the Abolethic Sovereignty was to unlock the Far Manifold with the Key of Stars and open the gate to the Far Realm to unleash their masters onto the world.[4] They were also greatly interested in the effects of the Spellplague, and searched and studied areas of active Spellplague across Faerûn. The aboleths kidnapped many living creatures for their ambitious experiments to improve of the dreaded Symphony of Madness.[1][5]

Xxiphu was a mobile city, and that allowed the Abolethic Sovereignty to operate throughout all Faerûn.[1] However, they focused their efforts on the region of Sea of Fallen Stars near Akanûl[6] and in the Underdark below Neverwinter.[1] They also held total control over the city of Olleth.[7]

HistoryEdit

In 1396 DR, Xxiphu was raised over the Sea of Fallen Stars[8] and the Sovereignty forced the kuo-toa into their service, by calling "Come to me, children of Toril, and serve."[9] Shortly after its raising, Malyanna moved Xxiphu to the Citadel of the Outer Void on the fringe of the Feywild to open the gate to the Far Realm, but failed.[4]

In 1429 DR, Xxiphu returned from the Citadel of the Outer Void to the sky above the Sea of Fallen Stars.[10] Not long after, members of the Abolethic Sovereignty moved against Akanûl and destroyed the city of Brassune before the genasi could repel the aboleths.[6] In the following decades, a branch of the Abolethic Sovereignty became interested in a pocket of Spellplague in the Underdark below Neverwinter and began to use it to further the experiments that would aid them to create the Symphony of Madness.[1][5]

In 1479 DR, the Abolethic Sovereignty was investing their efforts to thwart the New Neverwinter movement or to use it to advance their own agenda.[1][5] They were also interested in controlling the primordial Maegera, and for that reason enslaved the mind flayers of Gauntlgrym in an attempt to control the old mine and eventually control Maegera as well.[11]

MembershipEdit

The aboleths of the Abolethic Sovereignty were unlike the normal aboleths native to Toril. The aboleths of the Sovereignty were far older and had thought patterns different to those of the Torilian aboleths. Torilian aboleths usually avoided, or even opposed, aboleths of the Sovereignty. It was believed that aboleths of the Sovereignty were in fact the ancestors of the Torilian aboleths.[12]

For their covert operations, the Abolethic Sovereignty used the Symphony of Madness to control humanoids in subtle ways, making them excellent spies and sacrificial pawns without arousing suspicions in people around them. The rest of the servants of the Sovereignty were aberrant creatures: foulspawn, gricks, grell, kuo-toa, krakens, mind flayers and nothics.[6][11][13]

Among their most notable members were:

AppendixEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 90. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  2. Bruce R. Cordell (December 2008). Plague of Spells (Mass Market Paperback). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 162. ISBN 978-0-7869-4965-6.
  3. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 86. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Bruce R. Cordell (September 2010). Key of Stars. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 166–167. ISBN 978-0786956289.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 91. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 90–91. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  7. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 175. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  8. Bruce R. Cordell (2009). City of Torment. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 305. ISBN 978-07869-5184-0.
  9. Bruce R. Cordell (September 2010). Key of Stars. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 115–116. ISBN 978-0786956289.
  10. Bruce R. Cordell (September 2010). Key of Stars. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 330. ISBN 978-0786956289.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 92. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  12. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 172, 175. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  13. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 117. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.

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