Amethyst was a fancy stone related to agates and other varieties of quartz but held a higher value.[1] The deep purple hued stones were sometimes called "the crown of kings" because many rulers tried to decree that they only be used by royalty.[6] Among the drow, worshipers of Ghaunadaur knew these gems were sacred to their deity for consecration or sacrifice, and they were sometimes sent by him to show favor or disfavor, depending on the circumstances.[7]


Gem quality amethysts could be a light to deep purple, with the deep "royal" hues fetching the highest prices.[6] Amethysts were usually facet cut to show off their brilliance.[1][6] A typical specimen had a base value of 100 gp.[1][2][3][4][5]


Amethyst was one of the "nine secrets" used in the creation of ioun stones. This stone could also be used in the casting of spells that facilitated communication, such as magic mouth. Powdered and used in magic ink, it was used to make scrolls of these same spells. The best time of day to use amethyst as a component or ingredient was at mornbright.[6][note 1]

An amethyst was a required material component in casting swordward, a Tormish spell.[8] Crushed amethyst was also a spell component required for casting Nezram's amethyst aura.[9]

If a being wore enough amethyst gems of the highest quality, they conferred an unnaturally high degree of resistance to spells that attacked the mind, including complete immunity to chaos, feeblemind, hold monster, magic jar, and quest.[6][10][11]

Rumors & LegendsEdit

Folktales said that this stone could prevent intoxication and neutralize poisons so they were frequently used to decorate the drinking vessels of the nobility. In reality, they had no such abilities.[1][3][6] It was said that if amethysts appeared in a woman's dream, it represented romance. In the language of oracles and seers, amethyst represented safety.[6]


  • Priests of Shar generally liked to wear jewelry including amethysts when it was practical to do so.[12]
  • In the church of Torm, amethyst was the color (for robes or dyed armor) worn by priests with the high rank of Vanguardier.[13]


See AlsoEdit


  1. According to Elminster, this was between 7:45 am and 8:15 am.

External LinksEdit


  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 136. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Ed Greenwood, Eric L. Boyd (1996). Volo's Guide to All Things Magical. (TSR, Inc), p. 127. ISBN 0-7869-0446-1.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 300. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  4. 4.0 4.1 James Wyatt (June 2008). Dungeon Master's Guide 4th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 124. ISBN 978-0-7869-4880-2.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford, Christopher Perkins, James Wyatt (2014). Dungeon Master's Guide 5th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 134. ISBN 978-0786965622.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 Ed Greenwood, Eric L. Boyd (1996). Volo's Guide to All Things Magical. (TSR, Inc), p. 36. ISBN 0-7869-0446-1.
  7. Sean K. Reynolds (2002). Deity Do's and Don'ts. A Faiths and Pantheons Web Enhancement. Wizards of the Coast. p. 11. Retrieved on 2014-09-22.
  8. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 166. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  9. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 32. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  10. David "Zeb" Cook (August 1989). Player's Handbook (2nd edition). (TSR, Inc.), p. 17. ISBN 0-88038-716-5.
  11. David "Zeb" Cook (April 1995). Player's Handbook 2nd edition (revised). (TSR, Inc.), p. 23. ISBN 0-7869-0329-5.
  12. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc). ISBN 978-0786903849.
  13. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 165. ISBN 978-0786903849.