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Lolth (pronounced LOALTH[11]), or Lloth[12] in Menzoberranzan,[13] known as the Queen of Spiders or the Queen of the Demonweb Pits,[14][15][16] was the most influential goddess of the drow, within the pantheon of the Dark Seldarine.[17]

She drove the drow into heavy infighting under the pretense of culling the weak, while her real goals were to hold absolute control over the dark elves, prevent the rise of alternative faiths or ideas, and avoid complacency (even though she found amusement in the strife that plagued her followers' communities). [18] However, in the long run her influence proved to be an obstacle to the growth and success of the drow, preventing them from unifying against common enemies or for a common cause.[19][20]

Her sacred animals were arachnids. She considered them valuable enough to kill those who mistreated them.[21]

WorshipersEdit

Lolth’s follower base was varied. It mainly consisted of drow[15] but also included aranea, chitins draegloths and deep dragons.[22] She gained a few elven followers,[15] and tried to gain more worshipers by assuming the aspect of Moander, a deity of rot.[13]

ClericsEdit

Lolth’s clerics were almost exclusively female (although there were a few males). They represented the rulers of most Lolthite communities, and strictly followed the Spider Queen's will, forcing the drow into extreme subservience to their deity, and into the constant state of conflict that dominated their lives. Each priestess strove for the favor of the Spider Queen and was ready to anything in order to gain status in her goddess' eyes.[23][21][24] Their vestments were normally adorned with spider motifs. Her rituals required them to wear darker clothes or no clothing at all. Her clergy sacrificed the living and treasure for her glory.[23][21]

OrdersEdit

Militant Myrlochar, Order of Soul Spiders
The Militant Myrlochar, sometimes known as the Order of Soul Spiders, was an elite fighting organization comprised exclusively of male crusader, and found in the dark elven cities where Lolth was worshiped and males were allowed entrance into her priesthood. They directly served the reigning Matron Mothers of the city and were employed to kill their targets. They were usually used without pause until they got killed.[25]
Handmaidens of the Spider Queen
The Handmaidens of the Spider Queen were an order of female crusaders. Also called the "Daughters of the Yochlol", they had no ties to specific cities, and were used when Lolth wanted an entire city to brought back into line. At least three times in recorded history did the Handmaidens of the Spider Queen destroy entire drow cities to prevent them from straying too far from Lolth. One of their usual tasks was to terrorize merchants who took Vhaeraun as their patron, as well as settlements run by the followers of Vhaeraun or Ghaunadaur’s (or where those faiths were prominent).[25]

RitesEdit

Like all religions, the worship of Lolth involved a number of rituals and rites. Many of them included sacrifice. As an example, what follows was a secret sacrificial prayer in Abyssal known only to high priestesses:

"Great Goddess, Mother of the Dark, grant me the blood of my enemies for drink and their living hearts for meat. Grant me the screams of their young for song, grant me the helplessness of their males for my satisfaction, grant me the wealth of their houses for my bed. By this unworthy sacrifice I honor you, Queen of Spiders, and beseech of you the strength to destroy my foes."[26]

RelationshipsEdit

Dark SeldarineEdit

Lolth was the leader of the Dark Seldarine, but was opposed to varying degrees by all other members of it. She was the mother of both Eilistraee and Vhaeraun[17]

VhaeraunEdit

On one hand, Lolth encouraged her son’s rivalry with her, for it appealed to her love of chaos.[27] On the other hand, her son's successes at swaying the drow to his cause of destroying her, her followers, and her version of society,[28] led her to consider him a threat.[12] He amassed the second largest following among drow overall [29] (the largest on the surface),[30] and was an ever expanding force,[31] to the point that Lolth considered Vhaeraun her real enemy and rival.[32][33]

The two had no common ground.

Lolth promoted favoritism towards females,[21] Vhaeraun promoted gender equality;[28] the Spider Queen wanted surface elves to be sacrificed by her worshippers,[34] the Masked Lord urged his followers to cooperate with surface elves;[35] Lolth ordered her followers to keep drow society stagnant in every regard,[19] Vhaeraun attracted those who wanted change in the societal progress, economic growth, and territorial expansion; [33] Lolth wanted to extinguish the drow race’s desire to return to the surface,[36][37] Vhaeraun encouraged settling the surface.[38][28]

Vhaeraun's masked traitors, clerical spies of his whom Lolth mistakingly believed to be her clerics, were enough of a trouble to her that she considered finding and warning her clergy about their existence a matter worthy of her personal attention.[39]

All in all, it led Lolth--who normally gave worshippers of other drow gods a second chance on being found out--to make an exception with Vhaeraun’s followers, as they were killed right away.[40]

Other Enemies in the Dark SeldarineEdit

The other members of the Dark Seldarine were generally of minor importance[30] and Lolth’s behavior towards them could be described as derisive.

She considered her daughter Eilistraee to be an inconsequential fool, a moody girl [41] who could be easily manipulated into serving her ends. [42] The epithet used by Eilistraee’s followers’ to describe Lolth was "the Tyrant Poisoner".[43]

Ghaunadaur was a different matter. She feared the possibility that he could sway the drow towards his cause,[12] but he didn’t care enough for drow matters to attract many of them.[30]

Allies - Dark SeldarineEdit

Kiaransalee and Selvetarm were her allies (and the only ones in the drow pantheon), who acted as her servants.[17] The former was forced into subservience due to the power gap between her and Lolth, but she gained a degree of freedom after she killed Orcus and took Thanatos, the demon lord’s realm.[44] The latter was Lolth’s grandchild and her (self-appointed) champion.[45][46] Selvetarm was practically enslaved to her, but was quite comfortable under her rule,[45] enough to botch his chance at gaining freedom when his father, Vhaeraun, was about to kill Lolth.[47]

OthersEdit

SeldarineEdit

Lolth was an enemy of the Seldarine, especially of Corellon Larethian, her former husband, Sehanine Moonbow, for the part she played in foiling her scheme to overthrow Corellon, and Fenmarel Mestarine, who was her partner in adultery but ultimately didn’t join her betrayal.[13] While her hatred was deep, she didn't actually put any significant effort into acting on it, preferring to keep the drow engaged in deep infighting, rather than united against those whom she considered her enemies.[34]

Other enemiesEdit

She once helped Gruumsh to attempt to kill Corellon Larethian,[48] but after he failed, they later became enemies.[15] She also was the enemy of a long list of Underdark deities.[48]

Other alliesEdit

Lolth had occasional alliances with Loviatar and Malar.[15]

HistoryEdit

Lolth symbol - Mike Schely

Dawn AgeEdit

Lolth was formerly Araushnee, the lesser elven goddess of destiny and artisans. She was Corellon Larethian’s consort, and the main goddess of the dark elves.[48] They had twins together, the elder Vhaeraun, the younger Eilistraee.[49]

War of the SeldarineEdit

At some point, Araushnee grew ambitious and started to plot against Corellon. During her first attempt, she aided Gruumsh in trying to kill her husband by imbuing the scabbard that he had crafted for his sword with magic that would cause the weapon to shatter during the fight.[50][51] However, this plan failed due to Sehanine Moonbow's interferring with it:[52] she knew that Araushnee had tampered with the scabbard, because the Weaver had conducted this very first step of her betrayal during the night, when Sehanine's sight could reach her.[53]

Later, Araushnee agitated Malar into attacking the wounded Corellon,[54], after she witnessed the Beastlord killing the orc god Herne on Faerûn,[48] but even that failed, as the elven lord managed to chase his aggressor away.[55]

Araushnee’s next move was gather a host of gods on hostile footing with the Seldarine,[56] forming an army to assault Arvandor and overthrow Corellon. The army itself was so badly organized, that she was confident that they would fail.[57] Her true plan was to give the cursed scabbard back to Corellon, as during the battle that would later unfold, the item would cause arrows shot by Eilistraee to hit his chest instead. According to Lolth's plan, that would have killed Corellon while turning her daughter into a scapegoat.[58]

Before the attack by the anti-Seldarine faction was ready, Sehanine confronted Araushnee about her betrayal (as mentioned above, she knew Araushnee to be a traitor),[53] but Araushnee struck first and imprisoned her with the help of her son Vaheraun.[59][60] Together, they also made sure that Eilistraee would find and deliver the scabbard to Corellon, and that she would be in his vicinity during the battle.[61]

Once the battle started, the Weaver's plan almost went as she expected, supported even further by Ghaunadaur's entrance.[62] When an ogre god charged Corellon, who had been immobilized by the Elder Eye, Eilistraee swiftly fired a few arrows to save her father, but the scabbard drew the projectiles towards the Protector instead, nearly slaying him.[58] Despite all, the anti-Seldarine army lost and retreated as expected, and after the battle Araushnee tried to finish Corellon with a dose of poison crafted by Eilistraee to aid her followers in the hunt, pretending it to be water from Elysium with healing qualities gathered by her daughter.[63] However her plan ultimately failed due to Sehanine's intervention, as the Lady of Dreams had managed to break out from Vhaeraun’s prison, albeit at immense cost to herself.[59] Sehanine, Aerdrie Faenya, and Hanali Celanil joined into the triune goddess Angharradh, and used their combined magic to save Corellon’s life.[64]

When the elven lord awakened, a trial was called in, Vhaeraun and Eilistraee became members in exile of the Seldarine--in the case of Eilistraee willingly, as she had foreseen that the dark elves would have needed her light and hope in the future[65]--while Araushnee was made into a tanar’ri and sentenced to banishment. Furious for her defeat, he attempted one last time at her lover's life, by turning into a spider monster and attacking him. Despite all, the Protector still loved her and couldn't bring to finish her off, letting her escape.[66]

AftermathEdit

Lolth p82

Queen of the Demonweb Pits.

After her exile, Araushnee took the name "Lolth“. She conquered the 66th layer of the Abyss, the Demonweb Pits, for herself.[48] Lolth was initially opposed by Kiaransalee, an elven goddess whom she swiftly subjugated, and Ghaunadaur, with whom she had a longer conflict. That Which Lurks tried to subsume her, but failed, and in his rage robbed his followers of their intellect. It also downsized his follower base and his power with it, thus allowing Lolth to emerge victorious.[67]

After securing control over her layer, she plotted to exact vengeance against Corellon. Being unable to directly strike at him, she planned to be worshipped as a goddess by the elves, bringing misery to them--and therfore to their "father".[68] When the moon elf Kethryllia Amarillis came to retrieve her lover in the Abyss during a battle for the city of Sharlarion, Lolth became interested in the world the elf came from, Toril. She sensed the presence of Vhaeraun, at that time the major deity in Ilythiir, and her attention was drawn there. Her fascination grew as she witnessed the Ilythiiri--at the time under Ka'Narlist--preparing for war when Kethryllia had unknowingly revealed their position to them. Lolth admired the old mage’s craftiness and he became her first worshipper and consort.[69]

Ilythiir, the southern empire, was much to her liking, as it was richer and more cosmopolitan, but mainly because of the fierceness of its people, of their ambitions, and of their ability to act on those.[41]

First FloweringEdit

Originally, Ilythiir and the other elven nations were not on openly hostile footing,[70] but Lolth poisoned this relationship by causing wars and strife.[71] This led the elves to decide to create a dark elf-free piece of land.[72] They caused the First Sundering, which split a region of the continent from the mainland in order to create an island out of it, a process which caused countless victims, a large part of the church of Vhaeraun among them.[73] Vhaeraun’s efforts to remedy to this were undermined by the ongoing conflict between him and Eilistraee, granting Lolth and Ghaunadaur the opportunity to fill the void.[59] The Spider Queen then started her machinations that would eventually led to the Crown Wars.[13]

Crown WarsEdit

For Lolth, the Crown Wars were an opportunity to gain control over the dark elves and at the same time exact vengeance against the Seldarine,[41] as those conflicts destroyed the majority of the elven nations.

Lolth’s church grew in prominence during the Second Crown War.[74] At that time, Aryvandaar, the sun elf nation, had started a military campaign against dark elves of Miyeritar (which would later culminate in the genocidal Dark Disaster). Both to avenge their Miyearitari cousins, and in fear that Aryvandaar could similarly lay waste on Ilythiir, the Ilythiiri joined the conflict against the elven empire. The Ilythiiri coronal summoned Wendonai, a balor in service of Lolth, and bought power from it.[75] Lolth swiftly acted, using this golden opportunity to get the dark elves under her control.[76]

Other noble families of Ilythiir followed their royalty’s example, summoning further demonic allies sent by Vhaeraun, Kiaransalee and Ghaunadaur,[76] which gained them influence as well, but not as much as Lolth was acquiring with Wendonai tainting the noble bloodlines of the nation.[77]

At that time, the Ilythiiri were still refining their worship. They knew that Lolth was a spider deity, and that the other five gods and goddesses, who would later become known as the Dark Seldarine,[78] (with the eception of Selvetarm, who wasn’t born yet)[45] were in some kind of relationship. They didn't however understad the relationships among them. The Ilythiiri thus experimented with the iconography of these gods, depicting them as spider deities too.[79] These efforts to put the drow deities in this relation in each other were considered so offensive by the depicted, that Lolth, Vhaeraun, Ghaundaur and Kiaransalee killed their high priests for it.[78]

During the Fourth Crown War, the elves' wish for divine salvation, the worship of Lolth who was starting to spread among the Ilythiiri, and the taint of Wendonai which had corrupted their leaders, caused the elves to gather at the Elven Court and summon the power of the Seldarine to curse the dark elves and turn them into drow (even innocent ones and the followers of Eilistraee, who had already been exterminated by the Aryvandaari). The combined forces of the remaining elven nations then violently chased the newly formed race underground.[80]

Era of UpheavalEdit

Lolth symbol

The symbol of Lolth, during the Era of Upheaval.

Once in the Underdark, the drow lived in a borderline animal state. With Eilistraee's power nearly collapsed due to the loss of so many of her people, and with Vhaeraun's, Kiaransalee's and Ghaunadaur's power being unable to complete with Lolth's, she became the main drow deity. She gathered them together and urged them into the foundation of their first city, Telantiwar. It later destroyed itself through infighting, causing the drow to spread throughout the Underdark.[77]

A thorn in her side was a demon lord called Zanassu, who claimed dominion over spiders. Lolth got rid of him by using Selvetarm, her grandchild who was born from Vhaeraun and Zandilar when the Spider Queen's followers attacked the Yuirwood. (see here) Lolth convinced Selvetarm that killing the demon would have made Eilistraee--whom had befriended him, and whom he had come to admire--proud, so he fought and defeated Zanassu, but ended up absorbing his power and being bound to Lolth’s will in the process. Lolth thus solved two problems: one of her rivals was gone, and her daughter was prevented from getting an ally.[45]

Time of TroublesEdit

During the Time of Troubles, apart from appearing in Menzoberranzan and assuming the aspect of Moander to attract more surface elves, humans, and half-elves, Lolth spread information on Zinzerena, a goddess from another world. When she appeared on Toril, Lolth killed her, gaining the portfolios of chaos and assassination, and learning how the distribution and absorption of divine energy worked under Ao’s new rules.[13]

War of the Spider QueenEdit

The War of the Spider Queen was a period during which Lolth transformed herself into a greater deity, turned the Demonweb Pits into an independent plane[81], and then defeated her rivals.

Silence of LolthEdit

Queen of the Demonweb Pits

The Spider Queen.

In 1372 DR, Lolth suddenly became silent, starting an event know as "Silence of Lolth". She became completely inactive and no longer granted spells or communed with her followers.[81]

Vhaeraun took advantage of the situation and tried to assassinate his mother. She was seriously injured, but later saved by Selvetarm.[82]

When she finally awoke in 1373 DR, she called for three candidates to become her Chosen[83] and finalize her transformation:[84] Danifae Yauntyrr, Quenthel Baenre and Halisstra Melarn.[83]The first two came on their own to the Demonweb Pits, the last one was sent by Eilistraee to kill Lolth.[85] However, in the Demonweb Pits, after being defeated by the other two, Halisstra converted back to Lolth.[86]

Out of the three, Danifae was chosen to become part of the Spider Queen, Quenthel was sent back home[87] and Halisstra was made Lolth’s Lady Penitent,[88] her Chosen, whose duty was to hunt and kill followers of Eilistraee and Vhaeraun.[89]

The ReckoningEdit

In 1375 DR, Lolth and Eilistraee elected to play a game of sava with the future of the drow at stake.[90] Lolth’s strategy involved the employment of only two powerful servants of hers: Halisstra Melarn and Wendonai.

Vhaeraun, her son, came up with a new plan to kill her. He wanted to assassinate his sister and unite their churches to increase his power and become strong enough to kill his mother.[91] Halisstra Melarn managed to get her hands on Malvag, the organizer of Vhaeraun’s plot. Lolth ordered her Chosen to ensure his survival, and she went as far as reviving him after he was killed by Cavatina Xarann, a priestess of Eilistraee, to ensure that Vhaeraun would have a chance at attacking his sister.[92] When Lolth’s children clashed, Eilistraee emerged victorious, and Vhaeraun supposedly died.[93][note 1]

Meanwhile, Lolth's Chosen,[89] Halisstra, was sent to the church of Eilistraee to inform them of the whereabouts of the Crescent Blade (which Wendonai had made into a vessel for himself), and to lead Cavatina Xarann to the Demonweb Pits.[94] There the priestess killed Selvetarm with the Crescent Blade.[95] This event later caused his church to be completely absorbed into Lolth's:[96] the Spider Queen claimed that Selvetarm's loss was part of her plan, and Eilistraee too was led to believe it.[97]

When Cavatina returned from the Demonweb, Qilué Veladorn took possession of the Wendonai-possessed Crescent Blade.[98] Qilué recognized an evil presence in the weapon and planned to banish it, but the demon successfully convinced her to not act on it, for it would have destroyed the blade. Wendonai also let himself seemingly be killed by Cavatina, [99] which put the balor above suspicion of other followers of Eilistraee.[100] He would remain at Qilué's side for the next few years,[101] although the High Priestess of Eilistraee also started to hatch a plan to actually kill the balor by taking him into herself and using her Silver Fire to destroy him.[102]

Meanwhile, Kiaransalee joined the game in 1377 DR. The ensuing battle between Eilistraee and the Revenancer resolved in favor of the Dark Maiden:[103] the forces of Eilistraee successfully assaulted the Acropolis of Thanatos, Kiaransalee's main temple, and a ritual cast by Q'arlynd Melarn nearly erased her name from the minds of all living beings on Toril, leading to the goddess' disappaearance. At the same time, Qilué kept fighting against with Wendonai's influence, and his presence could be felt when the Dark Sister ordered the death of the defenseless clerics of the Revenancer in the Acropolis after that goddess' death.[104]

Ghaunadaur joined the conflict in 1378 DR, planning to attack Eilistraee in order to free his avatar trapped under her temple of the Promenade.[105] Qilué agreed to a risky plan to protect the temple from the followers of Ghaunadaur:[106] it failed (intentinally botched by former Vhaeraunites) [107] and the temple was lost.[108] Through its portal network the slime god’s followers managed to kill many members of the church of Eilistraee.[109] Lolth also unleashed Halisstra on her daughter’s worshippers, inflicting great losses that culminated in the following year.[110]

In fact, in 1379 DR, Eilistraee--while inhabiting the body of Qilué Veladorn--tried to free Halisstra from Lolth's clutches and convince her to kill the Spider Queen. However, Wendonai successfully nudged Halisstra into slaying Qilué alongside the Masked Lady.[111][note 2] Lolth then abandoned Halisstra after she fulfilled her purpose for which she was turned into a Chosen.[89]

During the Reckoning, Lolth miscalculated twice. The first time was Q'arlynd Melarn’s success at casting a second elven high magic spell. The intent was to turn all drow of the church of Eilistraee into dark elves,[112] even though only few hundreds were changed [113] (and their souls allowed by Corellon into Arvandor).[114]

The second miscalculation was Ghaunadaur. After getting rid of Eilistraee, Lolth tried to kill the ooze god, but he proved to be stronger than expected.[115]

Post-SpellplagueEdit

In the following century, Lolth enjoyed a position of supremacy among the drow. She did suffer opposition from the Jaezred Chaulssin,[116] the skulkers of Vhaeraun--the term used to describe those members of the church of Vhaeraun who retained divine magic despite their god’s death--and the followers of Ghaunadaur.[117] The latter group was however a dying force, at least among drow, for Lolth successfully extinguished the knowledge about that god.[118]

At some point in the years leading up to 1479 DR, Lolth ordered her servants to begin collecting blue fire items and relics important to Mystra.[119] Her ultimate goal was to become the new goddess of magic,[120] but she ended up failing with the return of Mystra.[121]

Post-SunderingEdit

After the event known as the Second Sundering, Lolth was no longer unrivaled as the goddess of the drow (even if she still retained her position of dominance), for the dead members of the Dark Seldarine were revived.[122][123][124] A further disadvantage for the Spider Queen, after their return Eilistraee and Vhaeraun reached a truce and even reciprocal friendship (although their followers still skirmished often).[125]

AppendixEdit

NotesEdit

  1. The Grand History of the Realms explicitly says that Vhaeraun's assassination attempt failed and Eilistraee killed him, though his continued existence suggests otherwise. In one of his answers, Ed Greenwood suggests that Eilistraee actually spared her brother's life. The Dark Maiden defeated Vhaeraun with the indirect help of her ally Mystra, as the Weave frustrated the Masked Lord's magic while enhancing Eilistraee's. The goddess temporarily took her brother's portfolio, and trapped his sentience in the Weave, where it was enfolded in a dream by Mystra. The Lady of Mysteries did that to ensure that the two drow siblings would survive the cataclysm that she knew was coming—the Spellplague—in which she would be "killed" to renew the Weave, and magic would go wild.
  2. In the same answer mentioned in the previous note, Ed Greenwood hints that Eilistraee actually managed to survive Halisstra's attempt to kill her, albeit much weakened. When Qilué Veladorn was killed, since the Masked Lady was inhabiting her body, a great part of her power was dragged into the Weave with the Chosen's soul (the souls of Mystra's chosen often become "Voices in the Weave" after their death, as explained in the novel Spellstorm, and their memories and experiences are shared by Mystra). After that, for about a century, Eilistraee could only manfest herself as a floating black mask surrounded by moonlight, capable of silently communicating with mortals, but not of answering prayers or granting spells (except by direct touch). After Mystra and the Weave were completely restored in 1487 DR, the goddess of magic could finally give Eilistraee her own lost power, and do the same with Vhaeraun, after having awakened him from his dream.

GalleryEdit

AppearancesEdit

Novels

ReferencesEdit

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  33. 33.0 33.1 Ed Greenwood (1992). Menzoberranzan (The City). (TSR, Inc), p. 72. ISBN 1-5607-6460-0.
  34. 34.0 34.1 Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 29. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  35. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 36. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  36. Ed Greenwood (1992). Menzoberranzan (The City). (TSR, Inc), p. 53. ISBN 1-5607-6460-0.
  37. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 54. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  38. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 38. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  39. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 37–38. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  40. Ed Greenwood (1992). Menzoberranzan (The City). (TSR, Inc), pp. 13–14. ISBN 1-5607-6460-0.
  41. 41.0 41.1 41.2 Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 173. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  42. Lisa Smedman (September 2007). Storm of the Dead. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 306. ISBN 978-0-7869-4701-0.
  43. Ed Greenwood (2004). Silverfall. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 66. ISBN 0-7869-3572-3.
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  45. 45.0 45.1 45.2 45.3 Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 34. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  46. Bruce R. Cordell, Gwendolyn F.M. Kestrel, Jeff Quick (October 2003). Underdark. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 33. ISBN 0-7869-3053-5.
  47. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 169–170. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  48. 48.0 48.1 48.2 48.3 48.4 Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 26. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  49. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 68. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  50. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 30. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  51. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 21. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  52. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 22–23. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  53. 53.0 53.1 Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 46–47. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  54. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 35–36. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  55. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 39–40. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  56. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 45. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  57. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 50. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  58. 58.0 58.1 Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 61–62. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  59. 59.0 59.1 59.2 Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 36–37. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  60. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 51. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  61. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 51, 56. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  62. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 137. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  63. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 63. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  64. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 65–66. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  65. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 67–69. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  66. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 70–72. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  67. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 137–138. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  68. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 138–139. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  69. Warning: edition not specified for Evermeet: Island of Elves
  70. Reynolds, Forbeck, Jacobs, Boyd (March 2003). Races of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 27. ISBN 0-7869-2875-1.
  71. Warning: edition not specified for Evermeet: Island of Elves
  72. Warning: edition not specified for Evermeet: Island of Elves
  73. Warning: edition not specified for Evermeet: Island of Elves
  74. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 52. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  75. Lisa Smedman (June 2008). Ascendancy of the Last. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 211–212. ISBN 978-0-7869-4864-2.
  76. 76.0 76.1 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 54. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  77. 77.0 77.1 Reynolds, Forbeck, Jacobs, Boyd (March 2003). Races of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 35. ISBN 0-7869-2875-1.
  78. 78.0 78.1 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 59. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  79. Lisa Smedman (June 2008). Ascendancy of the Last. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 13. ISBN 978-0-7869-4864-2.
  80. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 56. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  81. 81.0 81.1 Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 153. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  82. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 170. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  83. 83.0 83.1 Paul S. Kemp (2005). Resurrection Kindle Edition. Wizards of the CoastISBN 978-0-7869-5686-9.
  84. Paul S. Kemp (2005). Resurrection Kindle Edition. Wizards of the CoastISBN 978-0-7869-5686-9.
  85. Paul S. Kemp (2005). Resurrection Kindle Edition. Wizards of the CoastISBN 978-0-7869-5686-9.
  86. Paul S. Kemp (2005). Resurrection Kindle Edition. Wizards of the CoastISBN 978-0-7869-5686-9.
  87. Paul S. Kemp (2005). Resurrection Kindle Edition. Wizards of the CoastISBN 978-0-7869-5686-9.
  88. Paul S. Kemp (2005). Resurrection Kindle Edition. Wizards of the CoastISBN 978-0-7869-5686-9.
  89. 89.0 89.1 89.2 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 72. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  90. Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 158. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  91. Lisa Smedman (January 2007). Sacrifice of the Widow. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 246–247. ISBN 0-7869-4250-9.
  92. Lisa Smedman (January 2007). Sacrifice of the Widow. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 114–120. ISBN 0-7869-4250-9.
  93. Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 158–159. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  94. Lisa Smedman (January 2007). Sacrifice of the Widow. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 184–186. ISBN 0-7869-4250-9.
  95. Lisa Smedman (January 2007). Sacrifice of the Widow. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 284–285. ISBN 0-7869-4250-9.
  96. Lisa Smedman (September 2007). Storm of the Dead. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 33. ISBN 978-0-7869-4701-0.
  97. Lisa Smedman (June 2008). Ascendancy of the Last. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 5. ISBN 978-0-7869-4864-2.
  98. Lisa Smedman (January 2007). Sacrifice of the Widow. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 296. ISBN 0-7869-4250-9.
  99. Lisa Smedman (September 2007). Storm of the Dead. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 296–297. ISBN 978-0-7869-4701-0.
  100. Lisa Smedman (June 2008). Ascendancy of the Last. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 54. ISBN 978-0-7869-4864-2.
  101. Lisa Smedman (June 2008). Ascendancy of the Last. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 106–117, 144. ISBN 978-0-7869-4864-2.
  102. Lisa Smedman (June 2008). Ascendancy of the Last. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 978-0-7869-4864-2.
  103. Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 158–159. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  104. Lisa Smedman (September 2007). Storm of the Dead. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 297. ISBN 978-0-7869-4701-0.
  105. Lisa Smedman (June 2008). Ascendancy of the Last. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 3. ISBN 978-0-7869-4864-2.
  106. Lisa Smedman (June 2008). Ascendancy of the Last. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 106–117, 144. ISBN 978-0-7869-4864-2.
  107. Lisa Smedman (June 2008). Ascendancy of the Last. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 248–250. ISBN 978-0-7869-4864-2.
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  110. Brian R. James, Eric Menge (August 2012). Menzoberranzan: City of Intrigue. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 12. ISBN 978-0786960361.
  111. Lisa Smedman (June 2008). Ascendancy of the Last. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 291–293. ISBN 978-0-7869-4864-2.
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  117. Doug Hyatt (July 2012). “Character Themes: Fringes of Drow Society”. Dragon #413 (Wizards of the Coast).
  118. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 74. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  119. Bruce R. Cordell (June 2012). Sword of the Gods: Spinner of Lies Kindle Edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 2765. ISBN B005C5QS90.
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  124. Ed Greenwood (2016-06-07). Death Masks. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 0-7869-6593-2.
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Further readingEdit

ConnectionsEdit


The Dark Seldarine
The drow pantheon

EilistraeeLolthVhaeraun
Dead Powers
KiaransaleeSelvetarmZinzerena
Ex-members
Ghaunadaur

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