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Chondathan language

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Chondathan was a popular human language spoken mainly in the western regions of Faerûn.[2][3]

DescriptionEdit

Chondathan was similar to Common, but it was far more expressive and complex in its grammar.[4]

SpeakersEdit

The Chondathan tongue was spoken in and around Waterdeep, in addition to the ubiquitous Common and the northern language of Illuskan. Other regions where Chondathan was commonly spoken as a primary language included Amn, Cormyr, the Dalelands, the Dragon Coast, Sembia, the Silver Marches, Tethyr, the Western Heartlands, and the Vilhon Reach.[2] It was also spoken as a second language in Altumbel, the Anauroch, Calimshan, Chessenta, Damara, Impiltur, the Lake of Steam region, Lantan, the Moonsea region, the Moonshae Isles, the North, The Ride, the Sword Coast, Thesk, Turmish, The Vast[5] Dwarves of the Galena Mountains and the Spine of the World or within the Underdark sometimes spoke Chondathan,[6] as did elves living in the Chondalwood, Cormanthor, the Elven Court, Evereska, Evermeet, and the Sea of Fallen Stars.[7] Aarakocra from the Storm Horns also frequently spoke Chondathan as a second language.[8]

DialectsEdit

The variations of Chondathan spoken in different regions were sometimes named as distinct dialects.[note 2] Chondathan spoken in Northwest Faerûn was broadly termed Northern. It was spoken from the Ten Towns (Ten Towns pidgin/patois) in the north to The Way Inn in the south and from Neverwinter in the west to Llorkh in the east.[9] Sub-dialects of Neveren-Waterdhavian, Nesmé, Luruaran, and Llorkh were also named.[10]

The Shadow Thieves spoke a secret language known as Shadow Cant, which was an argot derived from the Northern dialect, from when the Shadow Thieves were based in Waterdeep. Shadow Cant included vocabulary from Amn, Tethyr, and the Underdark.[10]

The Cormanthan dialect was the version of Chondathan spoken in Cormyr, the Dalelands, and Sembia,[10] from Teshwave in the north to Proskur in the south, and from the Far Hills in the west to Elmwood in the east.[9]

Trade Pidgin was a mixture of Chondathan and other Thorass languages spoken in the Heartlands and around the Sea of Fallen Stars that integrated many military terms from Cormanthan after the invasion of the Grand Army of the Tuigan. The version of Trade Pidgin spoken around the Inner Sea was strongly influenced by Easting. The accent of the Heartlands speakers was so different from the accent of the Inner Sea speakers that the two groups had trouble understanding each other.[10]

An older version of the Cormanthan dialect (Auld Cormanthan) was spoken in the Great Dale, from the Easting Reach in the west to Lake Ashane in the east and from the Dunwood in the north to the Forest of Lethyr in the south.[9]

Finally, Chondathian was the dialect of Chondathan actually spoken in the Chondath region, from Reth in the north to Elbulder in the south and from Arrabar in the west and Lotoli in the east.[9]

ScriptEdit

Like the majority of Faerûn's regional tongues, it used the Thorass alphabet.[2][3]

HistoryEdit

Chondathan was a modern version of the ancient Jhaamdathan language.[1] Among living languages, Chondathan was the most closely related to the Common trade tongue,[4][3] since Common was derived from Thorass, which was in turn derived from Jhaamdathan as Chondathan was.[11][note 3] This made it a part of the Central Thorass subgroup of languages.[note 1]

ExamplesEdit

Typical Chondathan surnames translated into such things as Amblecrown, Buckman, Dundragon, Evenwood, Greycastle, and Tallstag. Girls might be named such things as Arveene, Esvele, Jhessail, Kerri, Lureene, Miri, Rowan, Shandri, or Tessele, while boys might be named Darvin, Dorn, Evendur, Gorstag, Grim, Helm, Malark, Morn, Randal, or Stedd.[12]

AppendixEdit

See AlsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 The "Speaking in Tongues" article of Dragon Annual #4 does not classify Chondathan, as the language was introduced in the 3rd edition; however, it must belong to the Central Thorass languages group because of its known relationship to the Thorass language.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Since Chondathan was not described as a language when the "Speaking in Tongues" article was written, it is assumed that some of the Central Thorass languages listed in that article were in fact dialects of Chondathan, based on where Chondathan was said to be spoken in 3rd edition and later sources. Moreover, these dialects were never published as official languages anywhere else but in the "Speaking in Tongues" article. For these reasons, this wiki considers them dialects of Chondathan.
  3. Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition claims that Common derives from Chondathan, but this is overruled by the newer sourcebook, Races of Faerûn.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Reynolds, Forbeck, Jacobs, Boyd (March 2003). Races of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 86. ISBN 0-7869-2875-1.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 85. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Rob Heinsoo, Logan Bonner, Robert J. Schwalb (September 2008). Forgotten Realms Player's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 156. ISBN 978-0-7869-4929-8.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 84. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  5. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 11–16. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  6. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 19–20. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  7. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 19–23. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  8. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 30–31. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 Thomas M. Costa (1999). “Speaking in Tongues”. In Dave Gross ed. Dragon Annual #4 (TSR, Inc), p. 26.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 Thomas M. Costa (1999). “Speaking in Tongues”. In Dave Gross ed. Dragon Annual #4 (TSR, Inc), p. 28.
  11. Reynolds, Forbeck, Jacobs, Boyd (March 2003). Races of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 85. ISBN 0-7869-2875-1.
  12. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 12. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.

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