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Most players in our world simply use Common as a direct translation from whatever language they speak. However, certain words are different, as demonstrated by the following list.

AEdit

Alae (ah-LAY): "Fortunate Meeting". A contraction of an elven phrase. It was a greeting and reassurance of peaceful intentions between travelers in the southern and eastern coastlands around the Sea of Fallen Stars.[1] It became a common greeting across all Faerûn during the 15th century DR.[2]

Alavairthae (pronounced: /ɑːlɑːˈvɛərθal-ah-VARE-thay[3]): "May your skill prevail". A common farewell among the Red Wizards of Thay.[3]

Alehouse: Tavern.[4]

Amarast (pronounced: /ɑːmɑːˈrɑːstah-mah-RAST[3]) "Fare well until next we meet!". A common farewell among the sailors of the South.[3]

Anyhail: Anyhow, anyway.[5]

Art or The Art: Arcane magic and its mastery.[6]

BEdit

Badaulder (BAH-doll-durr): - Hogwash, nonsense, etc. It originated in the Western Heartlands, but in the late 14th century DR its usage creep into Cormyr, the Dalelands, the Moonsea, and Sembia.[5]

Bluefin: - Tuna[7]

Blusterwing: - Grouse

Brighstar: Could mean either great, exciting, pleasing, marvelous, or superb.[5]

Browncap: - a wild mushroom.

Burslake (or simply slake): - Trout

Bustard: - Turkey

CEdit

Candle-cup: A bed paired with a table and an oil lamp.[8]

Chamberjack or chambermaid, informally jack or maid: An employee of an small inn.[9]

Clevershanks or clevertongue: A know-it-all. The first word refers to men, the second to women.[5]

Codloose winker: Lecher

Croft: An steading or an isolated farm.[10]

Crofter: The owner of a croft, or a worker of said croft (usually, kin to the owner). Can also be used as substitute for farmer.[10]

DEdit

Darburl (DAR-burl): Angry.[5]

Darchains: Suites of linked rooms in a house, usually three.[10]

Darkblade: A mercenary with dubious morals and/or loyalty.[11]

Darkhall: Any rundown house.[8]

Deepnight: Midnight.[12]

Doorguard: A guard that guards a doorway of a building.[13]

Durgos (DUR-ghosz): "Peace". A corrupted form of the orcish greeting "Durgreos". Used by mongrelmen and human slavers.[1] In the 15th century DR, it as also a popular greeting among dragonborn, and traders and sailors of all races.[2]

EEdit

Elsun: Late morning.[12]

Evenfeast: Dinner.[5]

Eventide: Gloaming.[12]

FEdit

Fieldings: Vegetables

Fireseared: Grilled

Flamed: Seared

GEdit

Galad: Heartlands word meaning something akin to "I'm astonished!"[14]

Garderobe: Bathroom. Another term for a bathroom was jake. Outdoor bathrooms were called privies, thunderthrones, or gloryhouses.[8]

Glim/Glimmer: Something beautiful or flashy.[5]

Goldenpanned: Sautéed.

Godswake: Predawn.[12]

Goodsir and goodwoman, or sometimes fairlady: A polite greeting, usually used with strangers.[2]

Gulletfire: Bad beer or wine.[6]

HEdit

Harbright: Full morning.[12]

Hardjaws: Garrulous regulars of a tavern.[5]

Haularake (pronounced: /ˈhɑːrɑːkɛHAH-rake[15]): God-damnit. It was an all-faith polite insult.[15]

Hawksnarl: A man who always yelled or was nastier or more aggressive than prudent or necessary.[6]

Hay-nose: A hick. Bumpkin is also used for this term.[5]

Highborn or high-nose: A noble. The second word was a pejorative.[5]

Highsun: Noon.[5]

Highsunfeast: Lunch.[5]

Hiresword: A mercenary.

Holy-nose: A priest. It was a mild-offensive word.[5]

Hrast (pronounced: /hɜːrˈrɑːsthur-RAST[15] or hrammar (pronounced: /hɜːrˈrɑːməhur-RAM-uh[15]) in the south: A non-deity-specific "damn".[15]

Hrasting (pronounced: /hɜːrˈrɑːstɪŋhur-RAST-ing[15]: a mild form of stlarning; not related to hrast.[15]

KEdit

Keghand: A waiter.[4]

Kell: To try. It was a derisive, cynical or disbelieving word, used only when the thing you were trying to do seemed to be impossible. Kell never changed due to tense.[6]

Knuckle or thumbknuckle: Brussels sprout.

LEdit

Lalandath: - Agile, sleek or lithe, often used to describe female dancers whose beauty was accentuated by their movements.[14]

Lammath Drios (lham-math-DREE-ohs): "Fortune find you." Parting used in Essembra and the surrounding lands (except Sembia, as they see it as a word only used by bumpkins).[2]

MEdit

Mayhap: Perhaps.[5][note 1]

Morningfeast: Breakfast.[5]

Murdath: A standath without cellars.[8]

My hearth: My house. A term usually used to refer to a cottage.[8][note 2]

NEdit

Naeth (pronounced: /nθhnaythh[15], drawn-out "th") or naed (pronounced: /ndnayd[15]) in the south: Dung (exclamation).[15]

Nandra: Something mediocre. Usually used to bicker over prices.[11]

Navalar: Catfish.

Nightfall: Dusk.[12]

Nightjack or nightmaid, informally potjack and potmaid: An employee of a large inn.[9]

OEdit

Olore' (pronounced: /ˈlɔːroh-LOR-ay[3]) "Well met" or "Good day". A common greeting in the lands surrounding the Sea of Fallen Stars.[3]

On the morrow: Tomorrow.[5]

Orbal (pronounced: /ˈɔːrbɑːlOR-ball[15]): The Shining South equivalent of naeth.[15]

Outlander: A foreigner.[5][note 3]

PEdit

Plounce: - Squab

Parharding: - A swear word used as an adjective ("Parharding wizard!")[16]

Power: Divine magic.[14]

REdit

Rhambukkya (ram-BOOkh-yah): "Ride High". Greeting used by Shaaryan nomads[1] and the inhabitants of Elfharrow.[2]

Rivvim: Smitten, in love, lusty. As in "I'm rivvim for her".[14]

Roofwrack: A dilapidated house.[8]

SEdit

Sabbas (sab-BAS): "Run free." A parting used by centaurs, and by many nomads and riders of many races.[2]

Sabruin (pronounced: /sɑːˈbrɪnsah-BROO-in[15]): Get lost or harsher similar words.[15]

Scorchkettle: - A woman who always yelled or was nastier or more aggressive than prudent or necessary.[6] Sometimes, it was used to refer to both genders.[14]

Saer: See, goodsir.[17]

Sark (pronounced: /sɑːrkssark[15], drawn-out "s"): A more offensive form of Haularake.[15]

Sellsword: A well-established or veteran mercenary.[6]

Shaeling: Minnow

Sheelie: Bass

Shield: Pastry crust

Silverfin: Whitefish

Skaether: Restaurant

Sorn: Salmon

Spear, also known as greenneedles: Asparagus.[18]

Spurnarmor: A good-looking man or woman with a spectacular figure.[6]

Standath: A rectangular stone building with cellars. Common across the Dragon Reach and Moonsea.[8]

Stettar voh (stet-tar VOH): "Gods-power keep you well." A formal, peaceful greeting and parting among merchants in southern Faerûn[1] and in Laerakond.[2]

Stlarn (pronounced: /stəˈlɑːrnstuh-LARN[15]): Polite equivalent of F-word. About as blasphemous as "darn" used where we might say "screw" or "screwing" (stlarning).[15]

Straek (pronounced: /strrɑːkɛstrrake[15], drawn-out "r"): Something akin "go kill yourself, right now and painfully."[15]

TEdit

Tallhouse: A tall, narrow, tenement-like building sharing side walls with adjacent buildings. Tallhouses were common in Waterdeep, Athkatla, and the cities of Sembia in the 14th and 15th centuries DR.[10]

Tantam: A common greeting in the North.[2]

Tavernmaster or tankard-tender: An innkeeper or the owner of a tavern.[5][4][4][note 4]

Tenday: A week.[14]

Thael: Glad, pleasant or heart-lifting.[14]

Tharsun: Late afternoon.[12]

Throatslake: See, gulletfire. Also, a healthy and thirst-quenching drink that wasn't particularly pleasant.[14]

This night: Tonight.[5]

Thulsun: Early afternoon.[12]

Tluin (pronounced: /təˈlɪntuh-LOO-in[15]: A stronger form of sabruin.[15]

Turnshield: - Polite cormyrean term for bastard.

VEdit

Vasark: Horsemeat.

Vlandranna (vlan-DRANNA): "Gods grant". Used in conjunction with with whatever you wanted the gods to grant you. A corrupted Dwarven word used by those living on and around the Sea of Fallen Stars.[2]

WEdit

Waelo: Equivalent to "hey, there!".[11]

Watchwolf: - A guard.[19]

Wench: A barmaid or a waitress.[4][note 5]

ZEdit

Zzar: - Ice wine.

AppendixEdit

NotesEdit

  1. The word "perhaps" was also used in the Realms, but only by bards, minstrels, nobles, and many middle-class merchants. However, it was only used in conversation with people close to the speaker; it was never used in public or while talking with strangers.
  2. In the Realms, the word "cabin" didn't exist and "cottage" is rarely used.
  3. In the Realms, this term is not considered pejorative.
  4. In the Realms, the words barkeep, barkeeper or bartender doesn't exist.
  5. In the Realms, this term is not considered pejorative.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Ed Greenwood (August 1992). “The Everwinking Eye”. In Jean Rabe ed. Polyhedron #74 (TSR), p. 14.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 47. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Jeff Grubb, Ed Greenwood and Karen S. Martin (1987). Forgotten Realms Campaign Set (Cyclopedia of the Realms). (TSR, Inc), p. 9. ISBN 0-8803-8472-7.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 Ed Greenwood (October 2012). Ed Greenwood Presents Elminster's Forgotten Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 79. ISBN 0786960345.
  5. 5.00 5.01 5.02 5.03 5.04 5.05 5.06 5.07 5.08 5.09 5.10 5.11 5.12 5.13 5.14 5.15 5.16 5.17 5.18 Ed Greenwood (October 2012). Ed Greenwood Presents Elminster's Forgotten Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 13. ISBN 0786960345.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 46. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  7. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 80. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 Ed Greenwood (October 2012). Ed Greenwood Presents Elminster's Forgotten Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 78. ISBN 0786960345.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Ed Greenwood (October 2012). Ed Greenwood Presents Elminster's Forgotten Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 80. ISBN 0786960345.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 Ed Greenwood (October 2012). Ed Greenwood Presents Elminster's Forgotten Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 77. ISBN 0786960345.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 Ed Greenwood, Eric L. Boyd (March 2006). Power of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 66. ISBN 0-7869-3910-9.
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 12.5 12.6 12.7 Ed Greenwood (October 2012). Ed Greenwood Presents Elminster's Forgotten Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 18. ISBN 0786960345.
  13. Ed Greenwood (2004). Silverfall. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 25. ISBN 0-7869-3572-3.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 14.6 14.7 Ed Greenwood (October 2012). Ed Greenwood Presents Elminster's Forgotten Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 14. ISBN 0786960345.
  15. 15.00 15.01 15.02 15.03 15.04 15.05 15.06 15.07 15.08 15.09 15.10 15.11 15.12 15.13 15.14 15.15 15.16 15.17 15.18 15.19 15.20 15.21 Ed Greenwood (October 2012). Ed Greenwood Presents Elminster's Forgotten Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 16. ISBN 0786960345.
  16. Steven E. Schend (September 2008). Blackstaff Tower. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 0-7869-4913-9.
  17. Ed Greenwood (October 2012). Ed Greenwood Presents Elminster's Forgotten Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 17. ISBN 0786960345.
  18. Ed Greenwood (December 1993). “Elminster's Notebook #1: Lord Kuldak Maurancz”. In Kim Mohan ed. Dragon #200 (TSR, Inc.), pp. 144–145, 166.
  19. Ed Greenwood (2004). Silverfall. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 103. ISBN 0-7869-3572-3.