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Corellon, or more fully Corellon Larethian (pronounced: /kɔːrɛlʌn lɑːˈrɛθiɑːnkor-el-un la-RETH-ee-an[11]), whose titles included Creator of the Elves and the Protector, was the patron god of all elves. He was the creator and preserver of the Tel'Quessir, governing those things held in the highest esteem among elves, such as magic, music, arts, crafts, poetry, and warfare. Corellon lived in the realm of Arvandor. He approved of those who killed orcs and followers of Lolth, blessed those who aided others, and became angered at those who defiled the dead, or fled from their foes.[3][12]

DescriptionEdit

Corellon used to be able to call many forms his true form but fixated his to that of a male sun elf.[13] This did not mean that he lost the ability to take other forms like that of a female elf. Either of these forms looked beautiful and while the first impression of these forms was how lithe and swift these seven feet tall forms were, the strength in them was obvious to everybody.[14]

He always wore a sky-blue cloak, a large amulet with a crescent moon motif within a circle, that worked as a talisman of pure good, and a pair of dazzling gauntlets.[14]

PersonalityEdit

While Corellon shared the elven trait of pride that may border arrogance,[15] this never got the better of him. He was a god with an endless willingness to learn from others and acted on it, even including mortals to his sources of discovering new information, methods, and philosophies.[14]

AbilitiesEdit

Corellon was a master swordsman and a powerful mage. He expertly wielded his longsword and longbow and could cast spells from all spheres and schools. He could cast any ritual of elven high magic like casting a normal spell and could summon one to four powerful air elemental once every 10 minutes who then served him as long as he needed them.[14]

Corellon was immune to everything that inhibited his ability to move, caused wounds, or tampered with his mind, as well as to all illusion spells. It was impossible to hurt him with a weapon with an enchantment of less than +3.[14]

PossessionsEdit

Corellon owned Sahandrian, his glittering longsword, and Amlath'hana, his longbow, which he could use to hit targets within an entire mile. He did not need to care for lack of ammunition because his quiver had an endless supply of arrows.[14]

He owned an amulet, which worked like an amulet of pure good, and a wand, which worked like a staff of power, staff of the magi, ad wand of frost with unlimited uses.[14]

Divine RealmEdit

Corellon's realm was on Arcandor on Olympus.[16]

ActivitiesEdit

elves were believed that they reincarnated with a definitive goal of perfection as their final destination. Corellon, alongside Sehanine Moonbow, was the souls' guide towards that destination of perfection.[17]

He also wandered incognito on Toril to observe priests and craftsmen, and even taking a direct hand in protecting elven borders. As a general rule, though he watched over the elven race as a guardian.[14]

RelationshipsEdit

AlliesEdit

SeldarineEdit

Corellon was the Seldarine’s, the elven pantheon’s, leader[18] and was generally close with all of them, except Fenmarel Mestarine[19] who was Lolth’s, his former wife’s, partner in adultery.[20] He was married to Angharradh.[4]

OthersEdit

He was allied with various deities from the Faerûnian pantheon who dealt with nature or magic as well with the leaders of the dwarven, gnomish and halfling pantheons,[18] because to Corellon, human expansion was a source of fear.[21]

He was allied with daughter Eilistraee.[18] This relationship was strong but distant, Erevan Ilesere was closer to his daughter than he was.[22]

EnemiesEdit

Corellon had a long list of enemies.

GruumshEdit

According to orcs, the relationship between Gruumsh and the elven deities degenerated to hostility after the latter participated at a prank with the gods of other pantheons. They rigged a lot drawing to determine where each race was entitled to live and there were none for the orcs. Gruumsh was mocked, but destitution for the orcs was averted by Gruumsh creating a niche for the orcs to live. Henceforth, the orc pantheon was an enemy of the others, including of the elven one.[23]

While the orcs deny it, Corellon was said to have cut out one of Gruumsh’s eyes.[24] Their blood seemed to be compatible to each other for mingling it created elves[4] and also the Elf-Eater.[25]

Dark SeldarineEdit

Corellon’s enemies from the drow pantheon included Lolth, his former wife, Vhaeraun, his son, and Selvetarm, his grandson and others.

LolthEdit

Lolth was once Corellon’s wife.[26] She tried to take over his position as the head of the Seldarine and failed. For this crime, she was sentenced to banishment. She changed into a spider monster and attacked Corellon. Corellon couldn’t kill her and she escaped.[27]

Lolth hated Corellon and, due to her inability to fight him directly, her hatred took the form of hurting surface elves.[28] She considered this at best a secondary priority. Having fun at urging and seeing the drow fighting themselves was more important to her than putting efforts in killing the people of her former husband.[29]

VhaeraunEdit

After Vhaeraun’s betrayal during the War of the Seldarine, Corellon Larethian practically cut his son off with a shilling and exiled him.[30]

He gave up on the idea of turning his son Vhaeraun to abandon his ways.[14] He vowed kill him, if he ever tried to hurt his sister,[30] which was an empty threat, for the Masked Lord did threaten the Dark Maiden’s life, without known action against him on Corellon’s part.[31]

Interestingly the one type of magic, that Protector considered too corrupt for elves and thus suitable for drow, the usage of the Shadow Weave,[32] was the niche Vhaeraun filled in his role as the patron of shadow magic.[33]

OtherEdit

Other enemies of his were the goblin and orc pantheon and Bane, Cyric, Malar and Talos.[18]

HistoryEdit

Prior to the War of the SeldarineEdit

Corellon originally came from the plane of Ysgard. At some point in his life, he came up with the idea to conquer a part of Arborea by driving out the resident giants and did so and Arvandor was founded. The surviving giants went to the land, the elves abandoned in their emigration to Arvandor and founded Jotunheim on Ysgard, the first layer of Ysgard.[34]

He used to be every elven aspect in one but fixed his form into that of a male sun elf warrior when he made Araushnee to his bride. The background of this fixation was to create a perfect balance like his "male warrior" to his wife's "female artist" and so on. He also gave dominion over the dark elves to his wife. They had twin children, the elder called Vhaeraun, the younger called Eilistraee, of whom the latter was the favored one.[35]

Randy elf god

Corellon Larethian plucks out the eye of Gruumsh.

By this point, his enmity with Gruumsh was quite old.[36] According to legends, it started with him having participated at rigging lots to the detriment of Gruumsh (see Relationships).[23] But he managed to draw the god to the negotiation table. Gruumsh attacked him there, destroying Sahandrian. Corellon fought and basically lost due to a combination of elven arrogance and support from a traitor, unbeknownst to him his wife Araushnee, that caused his blade to break. While he was running for his life to reach Arvandor, he was tracked down by the orc god and there Sehanine Moonbow appeared and restored his sword to him. The elven and orcish god fought and Corellon disarmed and gouged out one of Gruumsh's eyes. The battle than was ended because Corellon couldn't kill an unarmed and wounded enemy. Corellon then went home to Arvandor, because Gruumsh promised he would fight him if he stayed and the elven god didn't want to risk his own demise.[37]

Back home, he was assaulted by Malar who was persuaded by Araushnee to attack Corellon, they fought and the elven god won.[38]

War of the SeldarineEdit

Araushnee tried to kill her husband again. This time by starting a war between an army of pantheons, that are against the Seldarine, like the goblin pantheon, bugbear pantheon, kobold pantheon, and other deities. This army was expected to lose. The real plan, Araushnee and her son and confidant Vhaeraun pursued, involved organizing matters so that Eilistraee gave her father a cursed scabbard, that drew arrows to the wearer, and let the daughter shoot her father to death by drawing her arrows. The battle started, by this point, Corellon knew that he had a traitor in his pantheon. When Ghaunadaur, an addition even outside of Araushnee's calculations, appeared, Corellon understood the depths of depravity the traitor was capable of for the ooze god could only to come to Arvandor when a real force of evil was there. He was attacked by an ogre god and tried to draw his weapon but Sahandrian was stuck in the cursed sheath and Eilistraee's arrows hit him.[39]

Father and daughter

Fan art of Corellon with his daughter, Eilistraee.

Two factors saved Corellon, the sturdiness of his ribcage and the fact that Eilsitraee used ogre-sized arrows, thus getting stuck in his ribcage. Araushnee tried to poison him with a dose of Eilistraee's hunting poison, but was saved by Sehanine Moonbow. The moon goddess created his new wife Angharradh with Aerdrie Faenya and Hanali Celanil. After healing her husband, Araushnee and Vhaeraun were on trial. Sehanine recounted her story and the sentence was banishment, but the nature of the banishment between mother and son was different in that the latter had still the option to return while the former had not. Eilistraee followed willingly into exile on request of her brother for she had visions of undefined dark times, that she believed could be stopped if she went into exile, too.[40] Said dark times turned out to be the rise of the drow.[41]

Araushnee was declared a tanar'ri and after a short fight against her former husband escaped.[42]

First FloweringEdit

Around , non-dark elves came up with the idea to create a dark elf-free piece of land, they tried to create it, and botched it if not for Corellon's and other elven gods' direct intervention. Evermeet was created with the First Sudering, the literal sundering of an entire continent, as a side effect. The Protector and Angharradh appeared before Starleaf and gave her the Tree of Souls[43] around -17600 DR.[44]

Crown WarsEdit

The sun elf nation of Aryvandaar wanted to get rid of the dark elfdark elves as a species. Their chosen method for doing this was to devise a ritual, that tied the dark elves to faerzress tying them to the Underdark and keeping them there.[45] Towards that end, Corellon's magic, channeled through his priests and high mages, turned all dark elves into drow and they were forced into the Underdark around -10000 DR.[46]

After the Fourth Crown War, Corellon urged the elves to form the Elven Court. They decided House Vyshaan to be the responible party for the Crown Wars and Corellon mandated elves in general to kill them. The Fifth Crown War started and ended thus[47] around -9200 DR.[48]

Founding TimeEdit

The activity of the Seldarine during the Crown Wars, especially the Descent and the killing of the entire House Vyshaan with Corellon's mandate made the sun elves who founded Siluvanede wary of the elven pantheon and their society was a godless one, that eventually gave rise to the race of the fey'ri.[49]

Age of HumanityEdit

Some time before 714 DR, in other words before the fall of Cormanthor, elves started to feel weary about competing with humans over land, and they wanted a piece of land for themselves that they did not need to compete over with the encroaching human expansion.[50] Under Corellon, the Seldarine started the Retreat,[51] a mystical compulsion felt by elves to abandon their lands for Evermeet.[50] Most of Corellon's orders followed the call and left Faerûn.[52]

In 1379 DR, a High Magic ritual performed by Q'arlynd Melarn transformed hundreds among those drow who were not tainted by Wendonai's blood or who followed Eilistraee back into their original dark elven form, and Corellon thus permitted the souls of the newly transformed dark elves to enter Arvandor.[53]

Post-SpellplagueEdit

After the Spellplague, Corellon's power stayed that of a greater deity, something that couldn't be said about the other deities of the Seldarine.[54]

WorshipersEdit

Among Corellon's worshipers were elves, eladrin, and their descendants, as well as many bards. His clerics wore silver circlets and gossamer robes of the brightest azure. One of his most frequent holy days was the quarter moon and Corellon was worshiped at natural geological formations with beautiful objects sacrificed to him monthly.[citation needed]

OrdersEdit

  • Fellowship of the Forgotten Flower: The fellowship was a loosely structured organization made of elven knights or elven warriors dedicated to the recovery of lost elven relics from long-abandoned realms.[55]

AppendixEdit

BackgroundEdit

James M. Ward created Corellon Larethian for the Deities and Demigods (1980).

ReferencesEdit

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  45. Warning: edition not specified
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