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Demigods or demipowers were true immortal deities and capable of granting spells[1] and were considered the first rung on the ladder of the gods.[2]

PersonalityEdit

Demigods were weak but often also the most inexperienced deities. This came often with a degree of shortsightedness that let them challenge stronger deities than they could handle. This could lead to their end.[3]

Those who survived, were those who were capable of assessing divine politics and their own inferior powers and got mostly ignored by stronger deities.[3]

Because they were limited in power, they were unattractive to clerics and those with ambition avoided the service to a demigods. However, demigods themselves were usually so happy about gaining priests, that they showered these priests with special powers, which were all within their low limits.[3]

AbilitiesEdit

A demigod owned all abilities of a quasi-deity[4] including the immortality[5]

Unlike quasi-deities,[6] Demigods were capable of granting spells and other abilities.[5]

A demigod could take the form of a regular animate object.[1]

A demigod had complete immunity against acid, cold temperatures, and electricity. Unlike hero deities, a demigod was completely immune to disease, poison and other problems like stunning, paralysis, or being put to magical sleep. It became also impossible to kill a demigod right away with magic or by disintegrating it. In fact, altering the form of a demigod became only possible if the magic originated from the demigod or another deity of equal or stronger power.[4]

A demigod could speak any language including non-verbal ones. They could speak to creatures within a range calculated in miles of themselves in a direct manner but also send telepathic messages and manifestations to their followers or people around dedicated sites to themselves.[7]

A demigod could inherently cast greater teleport as often as they wanted.[8]

A demigod projected a field of divine energy that protected them from physical attacks.[9]

A demigod had Remote Sensing and Portfolio Sense. Even without these abilities, their senses extended to a range that was counted in miles. They could block the sensing abilities of inferior gods.[10]

A demigod was surrounded by an aura that made enemies fear, break their resolve while elevating the morale of allies, or make people cease to conduct any action in awe.[7]

A demigod could conduct actions that concerned its portfolio very fast, in fact almost in an instant. They could also create magic items without having the theoretical knowledge how to do so as long as the items in question concerned the deity's portfolio.[11]

A demigod had some control over its own realm. It could set the temperature in there and fill it with smells and sounds of their choice.[7]

On the condition that the demigod's avatar or a holy relic dedicated to the demigod was present, a demigod could cause the revival of a dead creature.[1]

SocietyEdit

Due to their very natures, demigods represented a very narrow and restricted ideal or aspect of existence. This meant only a certain group of mortals would consider the demigod suitable for worship, until either the ideals that the demigod embodied become more popular or the demigod was given or took the portfolios of other deities. They had some hundreds to thousands of followers.[12]

There were a total of six categories of demigods. First, there were the ones whose veneration that was limited to a certain ethnicity, like Uthgar from the Uthgardt people, or to a certain region, like Shiallia in the High Forest. Second, there were the ones who were formerly mortals and were raised to godhood. These people's initial divine stage was that of a demigod.[1] Finder Wyvernspur fell into this category.[13] Third, there were the ones who returned from the dead. Their initial stage as a deity was that of a demigod.[1] Moander was an example of a once powerful god who returned from the dead as a demipower.[14] Fourth, there were those deities who shared portfolios inside the same pantheon and were weaker than the strongest member.[15] Garagos was the demigod war deity alongside Tempus, the greater deity of war.[16] Fifth, there were those demigods who simply did not have enough worshipers to have a higher rank.[1] Hoar fell from the rank of a lesser deity because he lost too many worshipers.[17] Sixth, there were freak cases. For example, Jergal was a greater deity at the time of Netheril[18] but reduced himself to the level of a demipower.[19]

Faerûnian DemigodsEdit

AppendixEdit

NotesEdit

In every edition of D&D except 4th, demigods have been the lowest rank of power of the divine god scale. They are true gods, just the weakest of the true gods. In 3rd edition this was represented by them having a divine rank of 1 to 5. They could grant spells and do anything a god could do, just of a lesser power than other more powerful gods.

4th edition brought in the idea of exarchs and calls them demigods, but actually they are only powerful servants of a (usually) god.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 17. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  2. Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), Running the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 45. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Colin McComb (1996). On Hallowed Ground. (TSR, Inc), p. 36. ISBN 0-7869-0430-5.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Skip Williams, Rich Redman, James Wyatt (April 2002). Deities and Demigods. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 26–30. ISBN 0-7869-2654-6.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), pp. 16–17. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  6. Eric L. Boyd, Erik Mona (May 2002). Faiths and Pantheons. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 5–6. ISBN 0-7869-2759-3.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Skip Williams, Rich Redman, James Wyatt (April 2002). Deities and Demigods. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 29. ISBN 0-7869-2654-6.
  8. Skip Williams, Rich Redman, James Wyatt (April 2002). Deities and Demigods. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 30. ISBN 0-7869-2654-6.
  9. Skip Williams, Rich Redman, James Wyatt (April 2002). Deities and Demigods. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 26. ISBN 0-7869-2654-6.
  10. Skip Williams, Rich Redman, James Wyatt (April 2002). Deities and Demigods. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 28. ISBN 0-7869-2654-6.
  11. Skip Williams, Rich Redman, James Wyatt (April 2002). Deities and Demigods. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 27–28. ISBN 0-7869-2654-6.
  12. Eric L. Boyd, Erik Mona (May 2002). Faiths and Pantheons. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 6. ISBN 0-7869-2759-3.
  13. Eric L. Boyd (1997). Powers and Pantheons. (TSR, Inc), p. 15. ISBN 0-7869-0657-X.
  14. Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), Running the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 58. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  15. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 4. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  16. Eric L. Boyd (1997). Powers and Pantheons. (TSR, Inc), p. 18. ISBN 0-7869-0657-X.
  17. Eric L. Boyd (1997). Powers and Pantheons. (TSR, Inc), p. 29. ISBN 0-7869-0657-X.
  18. slade, James Butler (November 1996). Netheril: Empire of Magic (The Winds of Netheril). (TSR, Inc.), p. 40. ISBN 0-7869-0437-2.
  19. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 32. ISBN 978-0786903849.