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Emotion, also known as emotion control, was an alteration and/or enchantment/charm spell that aroused strong emotions in one or more creatures.[3][4][5][8] There were divine[2][3] and arcane[1][4][5][8][9] versions of this spell.

EffectsEdit

The arcane version of this spell was generally called emotion and affected one or more creatures in an area designated by the caster.[4][5][8] The divine version was known as emotion control and operated very similarly to the arcane version, but could also be used defensively to shield the caster's true emotions from detection and manipulation.[3] The alteration/enchantment versions affected a 20 ft (6.1 m) cube, in which the arcane version targeted all creatures in the region,[4][5] whereas the number of creatures was limited by the level of the priest for the divine version.[3] The illusionist version covered a 40 ft (12 m) square area but had fewer options (see below).[8] The divine version lasted at least five minutes; more for higher level casters.[3] The arcane and illusionist versions all lasted for as long as the caster concentrated on keeping the emotional state heightened.[4][5][8] If any creature in the target area managed to resist the effects of this spell, they were completely unaffected.[3][4][5][8]

The emotion to be projected was chosen at the time of casting and was typically one of the following:

Rage/Courage (arcane, divine, illusionist) 
Affected creatures lost all fear, dropped their shields, and waded into battle with a berserk fury, completely disregarding danger to themselves. They were granted a small amount of additional health to help them survive and their boosted strength and morale made them more effective fighters. Emotion (rage) countered and was countered by emotion (fear).[3][4][5][8]
Fear (arcane, divine, illusionist) 
Affected creatures were overwhelmed with fear, typically dropped whatever they carried, and moved away from the caster in panic as quickly as possible, even beyond the range of this spell. If the spell wore off or was countered, and a creature attempted to approach the caster again while this spell was in effect, they had to again try to resist the fear when they reentered the area. Emotion (fear) countered and was countered by emotion (rage).[3][4][5][8]
Friendship (arcane, divine only) 
The demeanor with which affected creatures regarded the caster was improved. For example, a merely tolerant individual was moved to show goodwill, or a threatening creature became just cautious. Emotion (friendship) countered and was countered by emotion (hate).[3][4][5]
Happiness (arcane, divine only) 
Creatures became confident, content, complacent, and generally felt good about their current situation. Their reactions were more positive and they were unlikely to take any action against the caster unless sufficiently provoked. Emotion (happiness) countered and was countered by emotion (sadness).[3][4][5]
Hate (arcane, divine, illusionist) 
Affected creatures regarded the caster in a more negative manner. For example, friendly creatures became indifferent, or cautious creatures became threatening. For arcane and divine casters, emotion (hate) countered and was countered by emotion (friendship),[3][4][5] but for illusionists it countered and was countered by emotion (hopelessness).[8]
Hope (arcane, divine only ) 
Affected creatures gained a significant morale boost, making them more effective in combat and better able to resist all non-melee attacks such as spells, dragon breath, poison, etc. Emotion (hope) countered and was countered by emotion (hopelessness).[3][4][5]
Hopelessness (arcane, divine, illusionist) 
Affected creatures suffered a significant drop in morale and were likely to surrender or otherwise submit to the bidding of any opponent, retreat from conflict, or listlessly stand and do nothing. For arcane and divine casters, emotion (hopelessness) countered and was countered by emotion (hope),[3][4][5] but for illusionists it countered and was countered by emotion (hate).[8]
Sadness (arcane, divine only) 
Affected creatures became morose and self-absorbed with their own misfortune. This reduced their alertness, made them slow to react, and took the heart out of their will to fight. Emotion (sadness) countered and was countered by emotion (happiness).[3][4][5]

When divine spellcasters used emotion control on themselves, it afforded them increased protection from spells such as emotion (the arcane version of this spell), fear, irritation, know alignment, phantasmal killer, scare, spook, and taunt. Furthermore, the priest was instantly aware that he or she was the target of such a spell. If a protected priest was the subject of ESP or emotion read, he or she had a much improved chance to project a false emotion (chosen at the time of casting this spell).[3]

ComponentsEdit

The arcane versions of this spell (including illusionist) required only verbal and somatic components to cast.[4][5][8] The divine version also required some uncarded wool or a lock of fleece as a material component.[3]

HistoryEdit

The arcane version of this spell was invented by a Netherese arcanist Keonid in the year 1976 NR (−1883 DR)[10] and was part of the Mentalism specialization school of magic. Clerics and druids had access to the divine emotion control version.[9]

AppendixEdit

See AlsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 slade, James Butler (November 1996). Netheril: Empire of Magic (The Winds of Netheril). (TSR, Inc.), p. 23. ISBN 0-7869-0437-2.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 62, 63, 64. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 3.16 Cook, Findley, Herring, Kubasik, Sargent, Swan (1991). Tome of Magic 2nd edition. (TSR, Inc), pp. 65–66. ISBN 1-56076-107-5.
  4. 4.00 4.01 4.02 4.03 4.04 4.05 4.06 4.07 4.08 4.09 4.10 4.11 4.12 4.13 4.14 4.15 David "Zeb" Cook (August 1989). Player's Handbook (2nd edition). (TSR, Inc.), pp. 155–157. ISBN 0-88038-716-5.
  5. 5.00 5.01 5.02 5.03 5.04 5.05 5.06 5.07 5.08 5.09 5.10 5.11 5.12 5.13 5.14 5.15 David "Zeb" Cook (April 1995). Player's Handbook 2nd edition (revised). (TSR, Inc.), p. 200. ISBN 0-7869-0329-5.
  6. Richard Baker (1996). Player's Option: Spells & Magic. (TSR, Inc), p. 185. ISBN 0-7869-0394-5.
  7. Jeff Grubb and Andria Hayday (April 1992). Arabian Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 152. ISBN 978-1560763581.
  8. 8.00 8.01 8.02 8.03 8.04 8.05 8.06 8.07 8.08 8.09 8.10 8.11 Gary Gygax (1978). Players Handbook 1st edition. (TSR, Inc.), p. 97. ISBN 0-9356-9601-6.
  9. 9.0 9.1 slade, James Butler (November 1996). Netheril: Empire of Magic (The Winds of Netheril). (TSR, Inc.), pp. 124, 125, 127. ISBN 0-7869-0437-2.
  10. slade, James Butler (November 1996). Netheril: Empire of Magic (The Winds of Netheril). (TSR, Inc.), p. 26. ISBN 0-7869-0437-2.

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