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Feather fall (also written as featherfall[11]) was a spell that caused creatures or objects to fall slowly, like a feather.[6][4][3][10]

EffectsEdit

An early form of the spell had a duration and weight limit set by the experience and the power of the caster.[12]

A later form of feather fall instantly changed the rate at which the target fell to an unnaturally steady rate of ten feet per second. The target of the spell was not damaged upon landing while the spell was in effect. Again the duration of the spell was limited by the experience and power of the caster. However, this spell had no weight limit, instead it was limited by size and number of targets. This spell could be cast in a moment.[4]

Post-SpellplagueEdit

After the Spellplague, this spell's effects lasted until the target touched the ground again. Feather fall was complex enough that its caster had to wait a day before casting it again.[3]

UsersEdit

Beholders had a permanent feather fall effect.[13] Silver dragons could use a feather fall spell-like ability.[14]

HistoryEdit

The Netherese arcanist Yturn was given for the credit for the creation of this spell in -1158 DR, then known as Yturn's feather fall.[15]

Feather fall was a common spell in the Realms by the mid–14th century DR.[16]

Notable UsesEdit

During the Time of Troubles in the Year of Shadows, 1358 DR, Naneatha Suaril pushed the avatar of Shar off a high balcony of the House of the Moon. However, Shar cast featherfall, causing both of them to land safely.[11] Later that year, the marauding Fellandar hurled the dwarf Onyx the Invincible high into the air. Kyriani caught him with a feather fall spell and brought him safely to earth.[17]

AppendixEdit

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ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 slade, James Butler (November 1996). Netheril: Empire of Magic (The Winds of Netheril). (TSR, Inc.), pp. 22, 25. ISBN 0-7869-0437-2.
  2. Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford (2014). Player's Handbook 5th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 207–211,239. ISBN 978-0-7869-6560-1.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Rob Heinsoo, Andy Collins, James Wyatt (June 2008). Player's Handbook 4th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 131. ISBN 0-7869-4867-1.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams (July 2003). Player's Handbook 3.5 edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 229. ISBN 0-7869-2886-7.
  5. Monte Cook, Jonathan Tweet, Skip Williams (July 2003). Dungeon Master's Guide 3.5 edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 181. ISBN 0-7869-2889-1.
  6. 6.0 6.1 David "Zeb" Cook (August 1989). Player's Handbook (2nd edition). (TSR, Inc.), p. 134. ISBN 0-88038-716-5.
  7. Richard Baker (1996). Player's Option: Spells & Magic. (TSR, Inc), p. 183. ISBN 0-7869-0394-5.
  8. Jeff Grubb and Andria Hayday (April 1992). Arabian Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 152. ISBN 978-1560763581.
  9. slade, James Butler (November 1996). Netheril: Empire of Magic (The Winds of Netheril). (TSR, Inc.), p. 122. ISBN 0-7869-0437-2.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Gary Gygax (1978). Players Handbook 1st edition. (TSR, Inc.), p. 66. ISBN 0-9356-9601-6.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Dan Mishkin (September 1990). “Total Eclipse”. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #22 (DC Comics), p. 8.
  12. David "Zeb" Cook (August 1989). Player's Handbook (2nd edition). (TSR, Inc.), p. 134. ISBN 0-88038-716-5.
  13. Skip Williams, Jonathan Tweet and Monte Cook (October 2000). Monster Manual 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 25. ISBN 0-7869-1552-1.
  14. Skip Williams, Jonathan Tweet and Monte Cook (October 2000). Monster Manual 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 87. ISBN 0-7869-1552-1.
  15. Warning: book within boxed set not specified for Netheril: Empire of Magic
  16. Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 152. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
  17. Dan Mishkin (September 1991). “Summer in the City”. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #33 (DC Comics), p. 6.

See alsoEdit