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The giant language, called Jotun by those who speak it, was the ancient language of most giants.[3] It was one of the oldest active languages. It was believed that the language shared some of its roots with Common and Thorass.[4]

ScriptEdit

Modern Giant was written with Dethek runes.[2]

GrammarEdit

Jotun tended to follow a subject–verb–object order, but there were exceptions. The copula, er, was often left out of sentences.[5][6]

NounsEdit

The plural forms of nouns varied depending on the declension. For example, the plural of jotun ("giant") was jotunen, while the plural of huslyd ("family") was huslyder.[5]

VerbsEdit

Scholars have determined that verb forms in Jotun were inflected, that is, they changed form depending on the subject of the sentence. For example, the verb fer, "to go", was known to have at least the following forms:[5]

sing. pl.
1st
2nd ferst
3rd fers

The participial form ferd derived from the verb and meant "going" or "journey".[5]

The infinitive form, fer, was used in commands, e.g., Fer zu dun heim, "Go to your home."[5]

PronounsEdit

The subjective forms, as known, are shown below:[5]

sing. pl.
1st Am
2nd du deg
3rd
masc. fem. neut.
han hun den

The following were the known objective forms:[5]

sing. pl.
1st meg
2nd du

The known possessive forms were as follows:[5]

sing. pl.
1st meg su
2nd dun

The two demonstrative pronouns were i and det, "this" and "that", respectively. The interrogative pronouns included wo ("what"), wer ("who"), and wie ("where").[5]

NumbersEdit

The cardinal numbers in Jotun are listed below:[5]

1 et
2 to
3 tre
4 fir
5 fem
6 sek
7 sju
8 att
9 ni
10 tier
100 hund
1,000 tusen

Numbers after ten were formed simply by following ten with the next digit, as in tier et, that is, there was no separate word for eleven. 20 and 30 were represented with to tier and tre tier. Similarly, 2,345 would be represented as to tusen tre hund fir tier fem.[5]

The only ordinal number known to scholars was stot, "second".[5]

HistoryEdit

Giant was derived from the Primordial language.[7]

DerivativesEdit

There are several languages and dialects based on Jotun that have evolved from it.

Jogishk 
This is the patois spoken by ogres.[8]
Jotunalder 
Similar enough to Jotun to be reasonably understood, this language has not changed in thousands of years and is used formally in ceremonies.[4]
Jotunhaug 
Spoken by hill and mountain giants, and closely related to Jotunise.[4]
Jotunild 
Spoken by fire giants.[4]
Jotunise 
Spoken by frost giants and closely related to Jotunhaug.[4]
Jotunskye 
The language used by cloud and fog giants.[4]
Jotunstein 
Spoken by stone giants.[4]
Jotunuvar 
Spoken by storm giants.[4]

AppendixEdit

NotesEdit

A lot of the words of the Giant language come from the languages of Scandinavia. For example: "Alv" is the direct word for "elf" in Scandinavia as well as "det" with the exact same meaning. Translation is complicated by the loss of the Scandanavian letters "Å", "Ä", and "Ö"; some of them lose their meaning for automated translation and gain another.

See AlsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams (July 2003). Player's Handbook 3.5 edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 82. ISBN 0-7869-2886-7.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Rob Heinsoo, Logan Bonner, Robert J. Schwalb (September 2008). Forgotten Realms Player's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 156. ISBN 978-0-7869-4929-8.
  3. Ray Winninger (August 1995). Giantcraft. (TSR, Inc), p. 9. ISBN 0-7869-0163-2.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 Ray Winninger (August 1995). Giantcraft. (TSR, Inc), p. 27. ISBN 0-7869-0163-2.
  5. 5.00 5.01 5.02 5.03 5.04 5.05 5.06 5.07 5.08 5.09 5.10 5.11 Ray Winninger (August 1995). Giantcraft. (TSR, Inc), pp. 28–29. ISBN 0-7869-0163-2.
  6. Ray Winninger (August 1995). Giantcraft. (TSR, Inc), pp. 32–33. ISBN 0-7869-0163-2.
  7. James Wyatt (June 2008). Dungeon Master's Guide 4th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 171. ISBN 978-0-7869-4880-2.
  8. Thomas M. Costa (1999). “Speaking in Tongues”. In Dave Gross ed. Dragon Annual #4 (TSR, Inc), p. 29.

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