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Ilythiir was a realm of the dark elves during the Dawn Ages and First Flowering (founded roughly -27000 DR)[8] before being destroyed after the Descent of the Drow following the Fourth Crown War.[9]

GeographyEdit

Ilythiir was an expansionist country,[7] that started in the southern jungles[10] and spread throughout southern Faerûn during the Dawn Age.[11] It experienced another period of expansion during the First Flowering, during which it spread across the areas later known as the Shaar and Forest of Amtar.[9]

InhabitantsEdit

Ilythiir was founded by dark elves.[10] Its leadership consisted largely of dark elves.[12] According to Ka'Narlist, this was due to a genetic dominance of the dark elves. If the same was a measure, the dark elves derived a claim for superiority from their trait.[13]

SlavesEdit

Ilythiir was a nation that institutionalized slavery. Known slaves included elves, wemics[14] and minotaurs.

After Syòrpiir, Eiellûr and Thearnytaar fell in the face of Ilythiir's strength, the moon and wild elves were enslaved. The aforementioned trait of the dark elves included their offsprings as dark elves in one-two generations.[15]

Furthermore, Ilythiir was a society in which results of the research topic "creation of life" were a source of pride and they did create specific creatures to serve them.[16] Athamault was one such research facility.[17]

Notable InhabitantsEdit

Clan Sethomiir

was the ruling House of Ilythiir. Its fiendish patron was Wendonai.[18]

Clan Hune

was a clan of Ghaunadaur-followers.[19] They aided the remnants of Miyeritar of House Aelryth.[20]

Ka'Narlist

leader of Atorrnash[12] and first worshipper and consort of Lolth.[21] Seemingly died in the First Sundering.[22]

Notable locationsEdit

After the dark elves were banished from the sunlit realms after the Crown Wars, most of the remnants of the empire were razed by elves hoping to eradicate any presence of their evil cousins. The ruins of Ilythiir were the most sparse of all the ancient elf empires to survive into later ages.[17]

Athamault

or the "Iron Pit" was a fortress built during the Second Crown War near the Lake of Steam. It served as a research facility for spells and the alchemical creation of life.[17]

Citadel of Slime

was a cave, that functioned as a temple, and a site to conduct sacrificial rituals, to Ghaunadaur.[17]

Elder Orb of Ooze

was a subterranean temple to Ghaunadaur. Clan Hune built it to empower themselves but were killed by their god for some offense.[19]

Misty Vale

was strictly spoken not Ilythiir's territory. The Wild elves who helped Ilythiir during the Second Crown War were granted this land.[15]

Narathmault

or the "Dark Pit" was a fortress in Riildath, or Forest of Lethyr and Rawlinswood, built around -10400 DR.[23]

OrganizationsEdit

The drow, Ilythiir's descendants, intentionally ignore their forebears' history for it forced them to accept how much they did lose,[17] still there were organizations, that did refer to their roots:

Church of Vhaeraun

was the church of Vhaeraun. Its goal was it to bring the drow back to power and take back what they've lost.[24][25]

Fanatics of the Overflowing Pit

was an order of crusaders dedicated to Ghaunadaur. It was presumed that they survived the fall of Ilythiir and continued to exist in some fashion in Llurth Dreir.[19]


HistoryEdit

Dawn ageEdit

The elves came to Toril via gates of the Fey, around -27000 DR.[8] The dark elves were the members of the second immigrant wave and differed from the elves of the first immigration wave, aquatic elves, avariels and lytharis,[10] in not wanting to lead tribal lives in forests.[8] During that time, dragons were the hegemons of Toril. Non-dragon races’ treatment ran the entire gamut of cattle to glorified slaves.[26][27] It wasn’t clear how they managed it but the Ilythiiri negotiated with dragons and founded the first elven state on Faerûn, Ilythiir, with the capitol of Atorrnash.[8]

Like all other elves during that time, the Ilythiiri didn’t have an idea that something like an elven pantheon existed.[8] They picked up the faith of Vhaeraun as the major one[7] and started had a successful expansionist policy with the church of Vhaeraun as the driving force behind it.[11] Ilythiir enjoyed a high degree of safety from dragons.[28] Ghaunadaur’s faith was a minor player[11] but was considered the more attractive choice for those wizards who looked to life force as a power source.[13] Eilistraee made it her duty to oppose the church of her brother,[2] but had only a small following.[1] In Ilythiir, religious affiliation wasn’t a factor that prevented one from climbing the social ladder as proven by Ka'Narlist, a follower of Ghaunadaur,[29] who managed to advance to a position like one of the leaders of Attornash.Where he was respected[12] and openly talked about his faith[29] as well as about his disdain of the major faith[30] to foreign diplomats whom he met for the first time.[31]

After accidentally destroying their own country[8] and downsizing their population to less than hundred[32] around -25400 DR, elves from Tintageer fled to Toril.[8] These elves sent emissaries to Ilythiir[12] around -25100 DR.[8] These emissaries knew about Ghaunadaur from Ilythiir.[13] That entity’s power was the basis for these elves to first bargain with,[33] then killing,[34] and then taking the red dragon Mahatnartorian’s territory for themselves.[35]

Around -25000 DR, the Dracorage mythal was created as a concerted effort of elves.[8] This act, gradually weakened the hold of the dragons and eventually lead to the end of the Time of Dragons[35] and with it to the start of the First Flowering.[10]

Around -24500 DR, Lolth’s attention was directed to Toril through the intrusion of Kethryllia into her Demonweb Pits.[9] Ka'Narlist became her first worshipper and consort.[21]

First FloweringEdit

During the first millennium of the First Flowering, Ilythiir spread further to the south and to the east of the continent. Around the time of -23200 DR, Ilythiir's territory included the Shaar and the Forest of Amtar.[9]

During this time Ilythiir was on generally good terms with the newly founded elven nations,[10] despite skirmishes with Orishaar that started around -20000 DR, which flared up and abated for about 7000 years.[36][9]

Around -18000DR, some Ilythiiri nobles discovered Ghaunadaur as a suitable patron for them. Other evil deities, Lolth among them, also made inroads into the nobility of that country.[5]

In a matter of centuries, Lolth's machinations successfully poisoned the previously good relationships between Ilythiir and the other nations. It went to the point, that the different elven subraces sought a means to get rid of dark elves.[37] The idea didn't revolve around killing but the creation of a dark-elf free piece of land. Among those who were excluded from the project and from the result were dark elves on their side like worshippers of Eilistraee The exclusion heightened general resentments between dark elves and others.[38]

Around -17600 DR, the First Sundering to create the aforementioned dark elf-free land was cast, the continent was destroyed as collateral damage. Among this collateral damage was Atorrnash, Ilythiir's capitol. The casualties in lives were immense[9] and it did also affect the religious landscape of Ilythiir. A large part of the church of Vhaeraun died.[39] Conflict with the church of Eilistraee opened the path for Ghaunadaur and Lolth to become more popular.[40]

Around -17500 DR, three elven realms, Thearnytaar, Eiellûr and Syòrpiir made steps to unify themselves into a single nation. Ilythiir sabotaged these efforts[5] by assassinating the three nations' leaders while simultaneously convincing each of the three nations of the culpability of another of the three. By -17100 DR, the three nations' relationships to each other deteriorated so far that they started the War of Three Leaves among themselves. The war ended around -16800 DR. By this point, the three came behind Ilythiir's involvement and started skirmishes against that nation alongside continuing to skirmish each other.[41]

Crown WarsEdit

The Crown Wars were a series of wars that led to the end to the elves' golden age.[5]

Second Crown WarEdit

In -11800 DR, Miyeritar lost the First Crown War against Aryvandaar.[42][41] This was Ilythiir's pretense to start the Second Crown War[43] in -11700 DR,[42][41] not because they had strong relationship with Miyeritar, their relationship was thin, but because that nation was the only other one with a meaningful proportion of dark elves.[43] In their quest to destroy Aryvandaar's allies, Ilythiir destroyed Orishaar. That nation was an ally[42] and major trade partner of Aryvandaar, which also lay physically the closest to Ilythiir.[41] These successes took its own momentum and new wars like the Second Crown War were practically a foregone conclusion.[42]

After Orishaar fell, Ilythiir isolated and burned down Syòrpiir around -11600 DR. This usage of fire was considered so offensive by Thearnytaar and Eiellûr, that they decided to fight Ilythiir.[42] They successfully stopped Ilythiir's onslaught on northern lands around -11500 DR.[41][44]

At around the same time,[42] Aryvandaar started something, what Ilythiir's leadership believed to be a genocidal campaign against Ilythiir's citizens. In their plight, Geirildin Sethomiir, llythiir’s coronal, made a decision. He summoned Wendonai,[45] a balor under Lolth’s employment, and bought power from the demon and with it from Lolth.[18] It catapulted Lolth's church to importance in Ilythiir.[42] The nation’s nobility followed their royalty’s example and bought power from other fiendish patrons. Around this time, the mind set and conduct of the Ilythiir became one that made the pretense to avenge Miyeritar sound less and less serious.[18] Until the Fourth Crown War, apart from Lolth, Ghaunadaur, Kiaransalee and Vhaeraun provided the dark elves similar help.[4] These kind of actions led to the Ilythiiri to gain the nickname dhaerow.[18]

The arrangement with fiends proved itself successful. Ilythiir found itself attacked during the Sable Wars, (circa -11450 DR). They faced an invading force from Eiellûr and Thearnytaar, in addition to a small amount of aid provided by Keltormir and Shantel Othreier, aiming to reform or conquer the dark elves before they destroyed any more realms. Over half the invading forces were wiped out by the dark elves' corrupt magic.[41][42][44]

By -11400 DR, Eiellûr was isolated and burned down like Syòrpiir. Ilythiir had help of who hoped to restore peace by appeasing the Ilythiiri.[41][42][44] A similar fate befell Thearnytaar in -11200 DR and with it the Second Crown War ended. That forest country was occupied by dominated monsters and undeads. [42][20] Keltomir got frightened of Ilythiir and prepared for an attack against it.[18] The two nations skirmished along its southern and eastern borders in the following years.[20][42][44]

Fourth Crow WarEdit

Around -11600 DR, resistance against Aryvandaar re-flared in Miyeritar.[23] The scale wasn't clear but Ilythiir's factions sending aid to Miyeritar's in the form of weapons, intelligence and training wasn't unheard of.[20]

Eventually, Miyeritar was destroyed by the Dark Disaster, the suspected culprits were Aryvandaar (based on no evidence),[23][46] or Miyeritar's high mages, as an accident to harness power for their resistance.[47] Either way, Ilythiir blamed Aryvandaar and the Fourth Crown War was launched, circa -10450 DR. This new wave of hostilities saw the Ilythiiri openly using the corrupt powers granted them by their dark and evil gods,[23][42][48] namely Lolth, Ghaunadaur, Kiaransalee and Vhaeraun.[4]

During this war, Keltomir ceded land around -10300 DR and forced Aryvandaar and Ilythiir to face each other in -10270 DR over the Stone and Claw Campaign,[23] it was the first time the two nations faced each other in a military campaign.[42]

Ilythiir attacked Shantel Othreier, by that point Aryvandaar's territory.[23] Over half a decade by -10110 DR, Ilythiir destroyed large parts of Shantel Othreier's forests with fire,[23] and by -11000 DR the entire nation.[42] Miyeritar's survivors fought on Ilythiir's side,[20] actually by this point in time, the claim [[dark elf]dark elves]] were only found in Ilythiir wasn't inaccurate anymore.[49] Still, elves asked the Seldarine for divine salvation.[23]

Elves' plea were answered by -10000 DR. Corellon's magic changed the dark elves into drow. Over the course of two months, weakness against sunlight and/or the efforts of the other elven nations drove them into the Underdark and Ilythiir ended.[23]


ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 16. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 13. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  3. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 13, 20. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Reynolds, Forbeck, Jacobs, Boyd (March 2003). Races of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 35. ISBN 0-7869-2875-1.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 51. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  6. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 13, 28, 37. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 109. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 8. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 10. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 Reynolds, Forbeck, Jacobs, Boyd (March 2003). Races of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 27. ISBN 0-7869-2875-1.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 28. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 113. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 117. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  14. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 120. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  15. 15.0 15.1 Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 113. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  16. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 117–118. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 17.3 17.4 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 58. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 18.3 18.4 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 54. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 20. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  20. 20.0 20.1 20.2 20.3 20.4 Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 14. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  21. 21.0 21.1 Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 156. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  22. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 173–174. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  23. 23.0 23.1 23.2 23.3 23.4 23.5 23.6 23.7 23.8 Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 15. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  24. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 38. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  25. Eric L. Boyd, Erik Mona (May 2002). Faiths and Pantheons. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 114. ISBN 0-7869-2759-3.
  26. Richard Lee Byers (April 2004). The Rage. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 337. ISBN 0-7869-3187-6.
  27. Template:Cite book/Realms of the Elves/Traitors
  28. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 118. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  29. 29.0 29.1 Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 116–117. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  30. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 116. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  31. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 114. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  32. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 96. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  33. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 128. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  34. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 135. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  35. 35.0 35.1 Eric L. Boyd, Eytan Bernstein (August 2006). Dragons of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 7. ISBN 0-7869-3923-0.
  36. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 29. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  37. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 157. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  38. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 158. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  39. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 174. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  40. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 37. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  41. 41.0 41.1 41.2 41.3 41.4 41.5 41.6 Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 12. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  42. 42.00 42.01 42.02 42.03 42.04 42.05 42.06 42.07 42.08 42.09 42.10 42.11 42.12 42.13 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 52. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  43. 43.0 43.1 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 53–54. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  44. 44.0 44.1 44.2 44.3 Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 30. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  45. Lisa Smedman (June 2008). Ascendancy of the Last. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 211–212. ISBN 978-0-7869-4864-2.
  46. Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 16. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  47. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 22. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  48. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 31. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  49. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 93. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.

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