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Interior Zakhara

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Vast interior Zakhara, like its Zakharan population, was divided into two distinct parts: the dry and barren landlocked elevation of the Haunted Lands took up its north and east and were the dwelling place of hardy desert nomads, genies, and the remnants of more bountiful days.[4][5][1] Its south and west, at the shores of Suq Bay and the Golden Gulf, contained great centers of civilization in the incomparable Cities of the Heart[6] and the devout Cities of the Pantheon.[7][8]

Geographic limitsEdit

Towards the northwest, interior Zakhara was separated from the Free Cities of Zakhara of the north by the length of the Furrowed Mountains, where trade and travel were made difficult by savage hill tribes.[8][9] In the northeast, the Haunted Lands slowly rose until they abutted the edge of the World Pillar Mountains, where the evil yak-men had their mysterious domain. The hills at the eastern edge of the Haunted Lands and, further south, the eastern-most ridges of the Mountains of Creation and the Mountains of Desolation separated interior Zakhara from the jungles of the east. Towards the south, al-Faraq Islands were still within reach of the Cities of the Pantheon, while the archipelago around the Naqq and Qutil Islands marked the border towards the larger Crowded Sea, with the Nada al-Hazan island chain being the nearest outside neighbor. In the west, the Golden Gulf separated interior Zakhara from the Pearl Cities in the south, and the hills along Suq Bay from the High Desert in the north.[8] Suq Bay itself, as lifeline of trade and travel among the Cities of the Heart, was still part of interior Zakhara.[6][10]

Haunted LandsEdit

Main article: Haunted Lands

The Haunted Lands were the larger of Zakhara's two great deserts. In the 14th century DR[note 1] they were sparsely populated by small tribes raising livestock and raiding trade caravans and each other. They had a rich history of fallen petty kingdoms.[8][4]

Cities of the HeartEdit

Main article: Cities of the Heart

The Cities of the Heart were a group of four metropolises that featured the greatest centers of religion, culture, trade, and industry in all of Zakhara.[6][11][12]

HalwaEdit

Main article: Halwa

The inland City of Solitude, at the bank of Wadi Malih, was a point of active trade between its larger sister cities along Suq Bay and the Al-Hadhar tribes of the Haunted Lands.[13]

HiyalEdit

Main article: Hiyal

The great and dirty City of Intrigue, near the mouth of Al-Wahl River, was a center for the production of metals and weapons. Its population had a reputation for underhanded dealings.[12][8]

HuzuzEdit

Main article: Huzuz

The City of Delights, Gem of Zakhara, located at the banks of Al-Sarif River, was the "heart of the heart" of the Land of Fate: It held the center of political power in the seat of the Grand Caliph, the nexus of trade in the Grand Bazaar, and the most important goal for pilgrims, the Golden Mosque. Golden Huzuz was famed for its sparkling roofs and cosmopolitan population.[11][14][8]

WasatEdit

Main article: Wasat

The Middle City, near the mouth of Al-Qalil River, was a rather quiet way-station for travelers between its larger sister cities. Its inhabitants were known for their even disposition.[15]

Cities of the PantheonEdit

These five cities formed the tight-knit League of the Pantheon, unified by a conservative outlook on life and religion and a firm and exclusive belief in the five Gods of the Pantheon.[7]

FahhasEdit

Main article: Fahhas

The City of Searching, at the mouth of Al-Naqus River, was prosperous in agricultural production of the surrounding farmlands, but its people were downcast and somber, and always questing for deeper enlightenment.[16]

HilmEdit

Main article: Hilm

The plain and colorless City of Kindness, near the mouth of Al-Muti River, was a model of lawfulness and charity towards the lower classes.[17][8]

HudidEdit

Main article: Hudid

The City of Humility, at the mouth of Al-Jana River, was famed for its trade in exotic goods, achievements in science and technology, and the largest university in all of Zakhara.[18][8]

I'tirafEdit

Main article: I'tiraf

The City of Confessions, at the mouth of Al-Hadi River, functioned as the Capital of the League of the Pantheon. It strictly followed moralist teachings of the Pantheon and also enforced them in visitors.[19]

MahabbaEdit

Main article: Mahabba

The City of Charity, at the mouth of Al-Munamma River, was dominated by the struggle between its strict Caliph and the League's military force against the followers of Bala, fighting from the shadows, leading to an oppressed and xenophobic atmosphere.[20][8]

TalabEdit

Main article: Talab

The City of Questing, at the source of Al-Muti River, was a meeting point between the Cities of the Pantheon and the surrounding wilder parts of Zakhara, and featured a major university. Despite this, its inhabitants were secretive rather than cosmopolitan.[21]

AppendixEdit

NotesEdit

  1. Canon material does not provide dating for the Al-Qadim campaign setting. For the purposes of this wiki only, the current date for Al-Qadim products is assumed to be 1367 DR.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), p. 124. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  2. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), p. 45. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  3. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), p. 14. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), pp. 42–44. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  5. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), p. 28. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), p. 58. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), pp. 94–95. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Maps). (TSR, Inc). ISBN 978-1560763291.
  9. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), pp. 27, 42. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  10. David Cook (October 1992). Golden Voyages (Map Booklet). (TSR, Inc). ISBN 978-1560763314..
  11. 11.0 11.1 Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), pp. 63–68. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  12. 12.0 12.1 Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), pp. 60–62. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  13. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), pp. 58–59. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  14. Tim Beach, Tom Prusa and Steve Kurtz (1993). City of Delights (Gem of Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), pp. 6–7. ISBN 1-56076-589-5.
  15. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), p. 69. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  16. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), pp. 95–96. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  17. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), pp. 96–97. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  18. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), pp. 97–98. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  19. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), pp. 99–100. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  20. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), pp. 100–102. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  21. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), pp. 102–103. ISBN 978-1560763291.

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