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Kingdom of Nix

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The Kingdom of Nix was a goblin realm lying in the western Yehimal Mountains, in the Utter East of southeast Faerûn.[1][4]


The Kingdom of Nix lay upon the high Forbidden Plateau,[1] beside a glacier in the Wu Pi Te Shao Mountains of the Yehimal.[5][2][3][note 1]

The only way to reach it was through the elusive Phantom Pass, but even then, Nix only appeared once a year, around harvest-time. Vanesci Hamlet, a human settlement, lay near the entrance in Konigheim, many miles from Nix.[1]


B&M Kingdom of Nix 1

The center of Nix, leading up to the keep.

The alien landscape of the Forbidden Plateau around Nix was covered in what appeared to be slabs of gray stone and greenish swamps. The trees were weirdly formed, with bulbous shapes and above-ground roots.

The buildings of Nix were mostly flat and rectangular blocks, built of some white material with round doorways and windows, some with chimneys and pale-blue roofing. Larger buildings were built all of this white material but were rounded and organic, almost if melted or grown. A thick city wall of similar make ringed the settlement. The inhabitants kept trees and gardens within the walls, but of the same strange plants as outside the city.

The heart of the settlement was the keep that housed the ruler. It was a large rounded structure, blue-grey in hue. The entrance was shaped to resemble a fiendish face topped with two tall and twisted horns. This was fashioned in the likeness of its resident: Redfang the Reaper.[1]


During the time of the Bloodforge Wars (648657 DR),[6][note 2] the Kingdom of Nix was ruled by Redfang, an insidious and wicked monster.[1]

Harvest of HorrorsEdit

Harvest of Horrors Redfang 1

Redfang the Reaper upon his throne as the stew is made.

Developing a taste for human flesh, Redfang instituted a reign of terror upon neighboring Vanesci Hamlet, which lay near the end of the Phantom Pass. Yearly, his harpies swooped down from the air, snatching people unawares to carry back to the cookpot. The seasonal appearance of Nix was a sick irony: as the villagers brought in the harvest, so too did the harpies of Nix. This doubtless earned Redfang his title, "the Reaper".[1]

At last, a mage known as Haradan the Hermit heard of the disappearances, and decided to investigate and put a stop to it, leading to the Harvest of Horrors.[1][note 3]

Haradan the Hermit
When harvest time came, he used his magic to fend off the harpies and protect the villagers, and not one was taken. Unsated and unwilling to give up his feast, Redfang sent a dark bloodforge army down from the Forbidden Plateau, assaulting Vanesci Hamlet directly, with Haradan leading a successful defense with bloodforges of his own.[1]
Following their victory, Haradan tracked the army back to Nix, intent on getting there before it vanished for another year. This trail took him through Phantom Pass, and another bloodforge battle with Nix's forces, before he made it to the Forbidden Plateau.[1]
Finally, with his bloodforge army, he invaded the Kingdom of Nix itself, facing Redfang the Reaper and his dark forces. Haradan was victorious, and his quest seemed to be at an end.[1]
Redfang the Reaper
A bloodforge army sent by Haradan invaded the Kingdom of Nix. Fortune favored Redfang, this time, as he received reports ahead of their advance. He even captured some of the enemy forces, deciding they would make either good slaves or good meals. Forewarned and ready for the coming bloodforge battle, Redfang's forces slaughtered the invading army.[1]
Redfang allowed the survivors to run back to Haradan, in a ploy to locate his foe and this source of slaves and flesh. As Haradan and his forces camped in Phantom Pass, Redfang and his horde stole upon them under cover of night and defeated them in bloodforge battle.[1]
Those who escaped fled down the Pass and back to Vanesci Hamlet, raising the alarm and bearing news of the terrible fate that awaited them. Redfang's bloodforge horde fell upon the village, overcoming its bloodforged defences. In a frenzy of savagery, Redfang and his minions cooked and devoured every villager they laid claws on, until their bellies were bloated and their vile hunger sated. Leaving behind an empty village, Redfang's horde returned to Nix, mapping a trail to Vanesci as they did. Redfang predicted that others would soon settle the area, a new crop for the pot, and he could repeat his blood harvest next year.[1]

During the Legendary CampaignEdit

In the aftermath, one Wurt Dumire came to enslave the goblins of Nix, putting them to work in a far-off mine. The commander of the Legendary Campaign felt unexpected sympathy for the goblins' plight and was compelled to act, trying to bring an end to Wurt's operation in a bloodforge battle in Nix itself.[4]

The commander was later appointed emissary to Nix, with the task of negotiating peace terms with the king of the goblins. However, in the midst of council, another ambassador, Adan Longstride, maligned the commander's good will in the Legendary Campaign, which aimed to unify the Utter East. In accordance with goblin custom, they had to resolve their disagreement in trial by combat—predictably enough, through bloodforge battle.[4]

However, some time after, the goblin king was slain, a political disaster that rocked the land. Opportunists both devious and aggressive gathered around the dead king's throne like flies, the most dangerous of which was Ibin Stormrider. In order that a goblin might claim the throne, the commander of the Legendary Campaign returned to Nix to attempt to drive away Ibin and the rest in another bloodforge battle.[4]


The main inhabitants of Nix were goblins. Goblin raiders typically threw spears.[note 4] Goblin enchanters were devilish and mischievous creatures, with the power to befuddle and dominate the minds of others.[note 5]

The harpies of Nix were known as merciless hunters. Swooping from the skies, they caught foes in nets and carried them off. They would drop their hapless victims in the cauldrons of Nix; their demise produced a burst of mana to power the bloodforges.[1]


B&M Kingdom of Nix 2

Bloodforge, obelisks, a goblin spear-thrower, city walls, and traditional cauldron of Nix.

The denizens of Nix, goblin and monster alike, thrived on a horrid stew, brewed in great cauldrons and containing the parts of all kinds of creatures. Under the reign of Redfang the Reaper, he and his minions developed a taste for human flesh to add to the cookpot.[1]

Local goblin custom insisted that disputes be resolved through trial by combat.[4]



  1. The geographic location of Nix is determined by comparing the game map of Blood & Magic with standard maps of the region.
  2. The events of Blood & Magic are only dated to "before the Time of Troubles" (1358 DR) in game. It is assumed these are a part of the Bloodforge Wars described in Faces of Deception and dated in The Grand History of the Realms.
  3. In the Blood & Magic game, two alternate campaigns are provided, one for Haradan and one for Redfang. These may be mutually exclusive, but it is possible one follows the other or they may be merged as a single back-and-forth conflict. Furthermore, Redfang's campaign implies this is the beginning of the harvesting of human flesh, which is contradicted by the opening. An official history is unknown, but the lack of Redfang in the subsequent Legendary Campaign suggests he was defeated by Haradan.
  4. Game artwork does not closely match typical D&D appearances. The Goblin unit is closer to an orc or hobgoblin in appearance, but the name is retained here.
  5. The Enchanter unit is described as a devil, but it is much closer to the traditional D&D goblin in appearance.



  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 Tachyon Studios (1996). Brian Fargo. Blood & MagicInterplay.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Karen Wynn Fonstad (August 1990). The Forgotten Realms Atlas. (TSR, Inc), p. 16. ISBN 978-0880388573.
  3. 3.0 3.1  (1989). Kara-Tur Trail Map. (TSR, Inc). ISBN 0-88038-783-7.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 Tachyon Studios (1996). Brian Fargo. Blood & MagicInterplay.
  5. Tachyon Studios (1996). Brian Fargo. Blood & MagicInterplay.
  6. Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 94. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.

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