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Mulhorandi was a regional tongue of Old Empires,[1] and the official language of Mulhorand.[2][3][4] A variation of Mulhorandi was the official language of Thay.[3]

SpeakersEdit

Mulhorandi was commonly in use between the River Thazarim and the River of Swords and between the Alamber Sea and Gbor Nor.[2] Other regions where it was commonly spoken included Aglarond,[5][4] Chessenta,[5][3][4] the Golden Water]],[4] the Great Dale,[5][4] the Hordelands,[5][4] Impiltur,[5][4] Murghôm,[3][6] Rashemen,[5][4] Sembia,[5][4] Semphar,[3][6] the Shaar,[5] Thay,[5][6][4] Thesk,[5][4] Unther,[5][4] the Vast,[5] and the Wizards' Reach.[4] Shou expatriates sometimes spoke Mulhorandi as a second language,[4] as did dwarves from the Smoking Mountains[7] and the elves from Sildëyuir and the Yuirwood.[8]

DescriptionEdit

Mulhorandi was highly inflected, that is, it relied on word affixes—suffixes or prefixes—instead of word order to convey grammatical meaning. To speakers of many other languages, it sounded slow and thick. It was a slowly evolving language and maintained much of the flavor of its earliest forms over time. Priestly rituals had a strong effect on everyday speech.[9]

ScriptEdit

In its earliest form, Mulhorandi used a logographic system of writing, with pictographs to represent concepts.[9] (Examples of these ancient hieroglyphs were preserved in such places as the Stone of Kest in the foothills of the Dragonsword Mountains[10] and in the ruins of the fortress Maskana in the Raurin Desert.[11]) Over the millennia, the written form of the language was simplified yet still contained tens of thousands of pictographs. The average Mulhorandi citizen had about 3,000 of these pictographs memorized, while the priests knew far more.[9]

At some stage in history, the god Thoth taught the Mulan the alphabet of the Celestial language,[6] and by the late 14th century DR, in most areas where Mulhorandi was spoken, its speakers used this alphabet; however, the Thayan dialect used the Infernal alphabet instead,[3] as a direct insult to the god-kings of Mulhorand, as does the cult of Set.[6]

Related LanguagesEdit

Mulhorandi was in the Mulani languages group[12] within the Rauric languages family.[9][12] It was related to both Thayan and Muhjuri.[12]

ExamplesEdit

Common Mulhorandi surnames included Ankhalab, Anskuld, Fezim, Hahpet, Nathandem, Sepret, Siasobek, Uuthrakt, and Zianhur.[13][14] Surnames starting with "Sia" or "Zia" indicated a bloodline from one of the gods.[14]

First names for males included Aoth, Bareris, Ehput-ki, Kethoth, Mumed, Ramas, So-Kehur, Thazar-De, and Urhur. Example names for females included Arizima, Chathi, Nephis, Nulara, Murithi, Sefris, Thola, Umara, and Zolis.[13] Tieflings from the Old Empires often had Mulhorandi given names.[14]

DictionaryEdit

aybtep 
horned[14]
bahati 
wise soul[14]
het 
smoke[14]
kamen 
dark[14]
katsu 
star-born[14]
hohl 
dark-eyed[14]

AppendixEdit

ReferenceEdit

  1. Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 25. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Thomas M. Costa (1999). “Speaking in Tongues”. In Dave Gross ed. Dragon Annual #4 (TSR, Inc), p. 26.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 85. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  4. 4.00 4.01 4.02 4.03 4.04 4.05 4.06 4.07 4.08 4.09 4.10 4.11 4.12 4.13 Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 11–16. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  5. 5.00 5.01 5.02 5.03 5.04 5.05 5.06 5.07 5.08 5.09 5.10 5.11 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 30–32. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 Reynolds, Forbeck, Jacobs, Boyd (March 2003). Races of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 97. ISBN 0-7869-2875-1.
  7. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 19–20. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  8. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 22–23. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 Scott Bennie (1990). Old Empires. (TSR, Inc), p. 13. ISBN 0-8803-8821-8.
  10. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 63. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  11. Template:Cite web/Secrets of Imaskar
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 Thomas M. Costa (1999). “Speaking in Tongues”. In Dave Gross ed. Dragon Annual #4 (TSR, Inc), p. 29.
  13. 13.0 13.1 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 12. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 14.6 14.7 14.8 Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 119. ISBN 978-0786965809.

ConnectionsEdit