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New Neverwinter was a imperialist political organization[4] created by the Open Lord of Waterdeep, Dagult Neverember, in the late years of the 15th century DR. Nominally, the faction's goal was to rebuild the city of Neverwinter, but in reality it was a simple propaganda movement to annex the city on behalf of Neverember.[1]

BackgroundEdit

Seeing the state of the city in the late years of the 1460s DR decade, Neverember saw in Neverwinter a golden opportunity to expand his power base and to create a mercantile empire under his command. Although Neverember desired to take the crown of Neverwinter for himself, he was aware that simply doing so would be not taken so well by the survivors of the Ruining of 1451 DR. So, he took advantage of the damage caused by the Ruining and the Shadovar–Thay War of 1461 DR[5] and devised the New Neverwinter movement to stir up nationalistic feelings within the population.[1]

Claiming himself to be a descendant of the Alagondar royal family and thus the rightful "Lord Protector" of the city (he dared not to style himself as a royal, for fear of alienating the people of Neverwinter), Neverember invested a great deal of his own personal fortune to hire hands, engineers and artisans to rebuild the city.[1] Aware that installing forces from Waterdeep would fuel a rebellion, Neverember relied on mercenaries from Mintarn, led by General Sabine, to enforce the law and to protect the city from monsters and bandits.[2] Neverember also hired adventuring bands to eliminate threats the Mintarn mercenaries could not handle.[6]

In addition, he installed Soman Galt as the mayor of the city instead of ruling himself.[7] Neverember also began a strong campaign to buy the interest of merchants and traders from other cities of the Sword Coast to send their caravans again to Neverwinter.[8] To attract them, Neverember established a policy of low tariffs for merchants and few trade regulations.[9] While in Neverwinter, Neverember operated out of the Hall of Justice.[10]

Neverember's ultimate goal was to make the people of Neverwinter feel indebted and feel gratitude towards him. He hoped to offer the people new facilities, market opportunities, access to goods, work and safety. And in doing so Neverember believed that when the time was right, the people would beg him to be their king.[7]

However, to anyone not critically involved in his planning, Neverember did not disclose his plans for the throne. Aware that if any possible heirs to the throne came forth his chances at becoming king would be ruined, Nevermber kept a reliable network of spies to watch and report on any such heirs. Neverember's savants managed to trace his own lineage back to Vers Never, a bastard son of Nasher Alagondar and give him a direct claim to the throne. Aware though that his word alone would not be enough, Neverember ordered the creation of books and records to directly link him to the Alagondar bloodline.[7]

Those tactics, combined with the physical improvements to the city in the late years of the 15th century, eventually drawn the majority of the inhabitants of Neverwinter to support Neverember's rule.[1][8]

Protector's LawEdit

Though Neverwinter fared the Spellplague of 1385 DR with little damage, the earthquakes that followed the Ruining tore open the Chasm, spilling the defiling energies of the plagueland below Neverwinter within the city's walls.[11] When Neverember first arrived in Neverwinter, in 1467 DR, numerous spellscarred victims and plaguechanged monsters roamed the city's ruins and outskirts. Neverember knew the city would never thrive again so long as people feared the Spellplague, so he took drastic action.[12]

He ordered the exile of any spellscarred from Neverwinter on pain of death,[12] while reinforcing the Wall's structure and bolstering the civilian forces stationed there with his mercenaries.[13] Often referred to as "The Protector's Law", this harsh measure was unpopular with many, and the factions that opposed Neverember's rule always pointed to the pain and suffering it caused as sources of their revolt. The Protector's Law was effective, however. In 1477 DR it was considered that the most direct effects of the Spellplague had been eliminated from Neverwinter.[12]

To combat the unrest generated by the Protector's Law, in 1479 DR Neverember began to fund research projects into cures for the Spellplague disease, and modified the law so that the spellscarred were to be sent for treatment at Helm's Hold instead of being exiled. Furthermore, those spellscarred who had any skill in fighting were given the option to "volunteer" to the Scar Company, to protect the city from further incursions from monsters from the Chasm.[12]

Other factionsEdit

Besides Neverember and his followers, there were many other factions involved in the New Neverwinter movement.[7]

Most of Neverember's decisions, regardless of his awareness on the matter, were influenced by a war between the nations of Thay and Netheril caused due to the failed activation of a Dread Ring in Neverwinter Wood during the early years of the 1460s DR decade.[5] Despite the fact the two main participants were the Shadovar and the Thayan followers of Szass Tam, led by Valindra Shadowmantle, the war was fought to gain dominion over Neverwinter.[14][15]

The Netherese weren't interested in Neverwinter proper, but wanted to use the city as a base of operations to increase their odds of recovering their old enclave, Xinlenal. Completely ignorant of Netherese interests in the region, Neverember had unwittingly hired several Shadovar agents to conduct discrete assassinations. Neverember's ignorance was so much that he was entirely unaware that hundreds of shades, shadar-kai, humans, undead and constructs were at work under Prince Clariburnus Tanthul to unearth Xinlenal and restore it.[15]

The Thayans, on the other hand, were greatly interested in gaining dominion over Neverwinter. Valindra wanted to activate a new Dread Ring by using the population of Neverwinter as fuel,[14] and she also wanted to secure the Neverdeath Graveyard, as the shadowcrossing connecting that part of the city with Evernight in the Shadowfell was of strategic value for the war efforts against Netheril.[16] One of Valindra's many sanctums lay beneath Castle Never, where she and her servants were trying to use the corpses of the Neverwinter Nine for some nefarious purpose.[17]

This 'shadow war' also served as the basis for the involvement of an Ashmadai cell allied to Thay, operating out of Neverwinter. Under the leadership of Mordai Vell, and while paying lip service to Thay, the Ashmadai also vied for control over the city. The Ashmadai made huge overtures to Neverember, which he in large mostly accepted.[18] Since he knew little about the Ashmadai though, Neverember did not reveal much to them. Grossly underestimating their power, Neverember believed he could use them.[7] Inversely, the Ashmadai began to turn Neverember's own people to their cause — controlling most of the mercenaries guarding the Chasm and wooing a handful of Neverember's close retainers. The Ashmadai's effort to seduce Neverember's allies went all the way to the top, with Mordai Vell personally pursuing Sabine. Ultimately, Vell hoped to induct Neverember himself.[18]

Other factions not involved in the Shadovar–Thay War were also interested in using the New Neverwinter movement to advanced their own agenda, as well.[7]

The destruction of Neverwinter also tore a giant Chasm through the earth of Neverwinter. Reaching all the way to the depths of the Underdark, this rift opened wide to an underground lake where a cell of the Abolethic Sovereignty was experimenting on the plagueland located there and the occasional survivors of Neverwinter they were able to capture. To the aboleths, the returning refugees simply proved to be a larger body of people on whom they could experiment. The arrival of Neverember in 1467 DR and the accompanying flurry of activity drew the attention of the Sovereignty, with the aboleths coming to see the reconstruction of Neverwinter as a threat to their plans. They began to send minions to keep the other factions busy while covering their own actions.[19]

For years, the orc population of Neverwinter Wood was rising to levels similar to those of the early 14th century, and at some point before 1466 DR Obould XVII of the Many-Arrows Kingdom sent his vanguard Vansi Bloodscar to explore operations in the area. Rather than report back to Obould, Bloodscar took over the Cloak Tower and claimed the River District for Many-Arrows.[20]

Not all Neverwinter citizens trusted Neverember's beneficent smile. Some of the men and women who refused to abandon the city following the Ruining saw the idea of a "New Neverwinter" as an insult to the city's sovereignty.[1] In 1474 DR, they banded up together as the Sons of Alagondar insurgent group. Swearing loyalty to Neverwinter above all else, despite going up against a much larger cause, the Sons of Alagondar traced their lineage back to Nasher Alagondar's loyalist servants and swore to restore rule to the rightful heir of Alagondar. The Harpers of Neverwinter, seeing Neverember as an oppressor opportunist who wanted to expand his mercantile empire, supported the Sons of Alagondar's rebellion, and even one of their high ranking members, known as Cymril, took up the leadership of the rebel group. Under Cymril, the Sons of Alagondar's actions were non-violent but annoying in nature by creating minor sabotages, stealing supplies and embarrassing mercenaries.[21] Unknown to the Sons of Alagondar was the fact that Cymril was a double agent working for Neverember to ensure that the Sons of Alagondar remained a minor concern.[22]

The New Neverwinter movement also drew the attention of Jarlaxle Baenre, who set loose his spies of Bregan D'aerthe to operate in Neverwinter.[23]

HistoryEdit

1479 DR:

In 1479 DR, the "New Neverwinter" movement had been able to restore key parts of the city, namely the Protector's Enclave[10] and the Docks,[24] but had been unable to repair most of the Blacklake District because of the Sons of Alagondar's activities.[25] Likewise, the restoration of the River District was frustrated by the orc occupation force.[26]

Taking his role as Lord Protector seriously, Neverember sent his mercenaries to oust the orcs in the River District and the plaguechanged monstrosities at the Wall. Beyond establishing laws and keeping peace, Neverember considered it a goal of his to root out any rebels. However, with his power in Neverwinter growing, Neverember ultimately relinquished much power in Waterdeep, visiting the Masked Lords irregularly.[7] Many adventurers claimed to be the "Lost heir of Neverwinter", but most of them were put to the sword by Neverember, who would not suffer the presence of a bothersome claimant to his "rightful throne".[27]

Aware of the implications of finding Gauntlgrym, Neverember began to send scouts out to find the ancient dwarven homeland.[7] In her desire to restore the Dread Ring, Valindra also began looking for a way to the capital of Delzoun by researching the area around Mount Hotenow and Neverwinter Wood.[28]

Mounting reprisals against the Sons of Alagondar, Neverember's actions resulted in the death of Cymril. A huge blow against the rebels, a power vacuum was created within the Sons of Alagondar and the disorganization caused internal conflict, leading to the splitting of the group into two opposing factions: the Nashers and the Graycloaks. Scattered and disorganized, the Sons of Alagondar movement would have perished had they not found allies in the Dead Rats gang and received funds from the Thayans. To insure Neverember's distraction, Valindra decided to fund the Nashers due to their more violent approach which included assassination, riots and sabotage.[29]

An old contact of the Nashers, Charl of the Dead Rats, had helped out to create the alliance between the Sons and the Harpers.[30] Valindra sought out Charl and convinced him to help her to create an alliance between the Nashers and her forces.[30][29]

Under Arlon Bladeshaper, the Nashers found themselves at odds with the more diplomatic Graycloaks. Skilled at bribery, infiltration and forgery, the Graycloaks wanted to pressure Neverember into relinquishing power to the civilians. The Graycloaks found themselves led by Madame Rosene.[29]

Because of the revelation of Cymril being a double agent working for Neverember, the Harpers experienced a setback in the region as their relationship with the Sons of Alagondar had become strained. With only around eleven members in Neverwinter, of whom only two were actual agents, the Harpers spent most of their time trying to figure out how to unite the rebels under a single cause once more. Their minor presence meant they too knew nothing of the Thayan or Netherese activities.[21]

When one of Neverember's spies, Seldra Tylmarande, obtained a false Crown of Neverwinter, the Red Wizard Tolivast attempted to steal it but failed thanks to adventurers intervention.[31] Creating the "Lost heir of Neverwinter" persona, Seldra began to try and take control of the city.[6]

The Nashers later formally announced their alliance with the Dead Rats and the "Lost Heir".[6] Tolivast's meddling with the crown nonetheless caused Seldra to lose her sanity.[31] After the "Lost Heir" saved people from plaguechanged abominations, General Sabine hired a group of adventurers to look into the figure. After fighting the Dead Rats and the Nashers, and killing Arlon Bladeshaper, the adventurers defeated the "Lost Heir" and exposed Seldra's true machinations.[32]

Meanwhile, Rohini, an agent of the Abolethic Sovereignty, sought out and converted Soman Galt and made him an agent of the aboleths. With Galt firmly under their control, the aboleths determined that any emerging threats from the way of Neverember would be easy to stamp out. The aboleths hated the Ashmadai, but were content to let Mordai Vell operate and did not consider him a serious threat. They also began to siphon as much information as they could on Valindra - hoping to convert her. However, the aboleths were delicate not to make themselves known when dealing with Valindra or any Shadovar, for even they feared the powers of Szass Tam and Telamont Tanthul.[33] Valindra was vaguely aware of the aboleths' presence and was enraged that she knew so little about so powerful a faction, but despite her best attempts was able to find out little.[14] Clariburnus on the other hand was aware of an unnatural presence, but did not care enough to even confirm that it was the Abolethic Sovereignty.[15]

With her primary purpose being none other than the stewardship of the Hex Locus, Rohini moved to Helm's Hold to ensure that it would not be detected. Becoming the Prophet of Helm's Hold, those who lived at the cathedral worshiped Rohini as a goddess. Collecting test subjects for the Symphony of Madness, Rohini also used the cathedral as a base of operations. Becoming a figure of power, the aboleths used her as a mouthpiece through whom they sent out "prophecies" to influence the region. Rohini's biggest capture came when none of Sabine's men were able to slay the green dragon Chartilifax; catching the dragon in the thrall of her beauty, Rohini placed the mighty beast in her crypts.[34] With the Abolethic Sovereignty making overtures to Vansi Bloodscar's orcs, Rohini beguiled the orc commander into accepting her blessing - a spellscar with which she hoped to control them with.[20]

This resulted in a turf war between the aboleths and the Ashmadai, as the devil worshipers wanted the Chasm closed. In his efforts to convert Soman Galt, Mordai Vell became suspicious of the mayor but wanted more evidence before he marked the mayor for death. Vell's pursuit of Sabine had begun to bear fruit as she visited his estate often. Even Neverember found Vell's presence to be enjoyable, the two spending much time together.[18]

1484 DR:

As several aspects of the Shadovar–Thay War began to settle down, Bregan D'aerthe had stopped operating in the city and was split between Luskan and Menzoberranzan for the Darkening,[35] which had also resulted in the cessation of interest in Neverwinter of the Many-Arrows orcs.[8] Primarily, the Netherese interests had shifted elsewhere and they focused their forces fighting against Cormyr. With the defeat of Netheril in 1487 DR, Thay became the winner by default and the war in Neverwinter came to an end.[36]

In 1484 DR, the activities of the Ashmadai began to ramp up after they initiated Elden Vargas into their ranks. Convincing Vargas to send his insane wife, Karis, to Helm's Hold, Mordai Vell then called in favors with Rohini to prevent him from seeing her.[37] Turning on Vell, Vargas began to go by the alias of the "Tormentor" and began to mind control victims and brand them with the symbol of Asmodeus, so as to implicate Vell's Ashmadai. Making it to Helm's Hold, Vargas defeated the Prophet Rohini and placed Chartilifax under his control. At the top of Helm's Hold, Chartilifax, Vargas and Karis were confronted by adventurers who defeated the Tormentor.[38]

Inadvertently, the adventurers strengthened the Abolethic Sovereignty's influence in the region when they saved Rohini.[39]

Some time later, Mordai Vell discovered the Waterclock Guild's Crypts, and in there the means to release and control the primordial Maegera the Inferno, who was sealed in Gauntlgrym. Vell wanted to use Maegera's energy to create a powerful magical scepter that would give him the authority to dissolve the Ashmadai's agreement with Thay and would also give him the authority to command all Ashmadai cells in Faerûn. Discovering Vell's intentions, Lord Neverember sent a group of adventurers to deal with Vell once and for all. The adventurers arrived in time to stop the ritual and killed Vell and his minions, ending the primordial threat to Neverwinter and dealing a crippling blow to Ashmadai activity in the region.[40]

At some point before 1485 DR, Neverember ordered the use of magical means to successfully seal the Chasm, although at a huge expense to the city's coffers that other parts of the city were neglected in the following years and much of Neverwinter remained in ruins by 1491 DR.[8][41] This action, however, enabled Neverember to start a project to rebuild the neglected southeastern quadrant of the city.[8]

Rohini was later discovered and presumably killed by a band of adventurers from Neverwinter. How this affected the Abolethic Sovereignty or if they had really killed Rohini, however, was unknown.[42][note 1]

1489 DR:

In 1489 DR, Neverember had finally lost what little influence he had on Waterdeep, and eventually he was exiled from the city and replaced as Open Lord by Laeral Silverhand.[8][3] However, due to this commitment and his past accomplishments helping Neverwinter and its citizens, the people of Neverwinter finally began to accept Neverember as their rightful leader, despite the fact that people from other lands saw him as a tyrant.[8] Bitter over being exiled from Waterdeep, however, Neverember became more despotic than ever and enforced heavy-handed laws. He levied heavy taxes to noble families living in Neverwinter, preventing them to gain significant power, while enacting harsh laws that prohibited the formation of new guilds and limited the power of existing ones.[41]

His staunch opposition, the Sons of Alagondar, eventually began to volunteer themselves to serve as the city guard, making Neverember to depend less on the services of the Mintarn mercenaries. Neverember still hired a few adventurers and mercenaries to help to protect Neverwinter and train the local troops rather than to accept the help of the armies of the Masked Lords of Waterdeep, who he felt had betrayed him.[8]

When followers of Tyr went to Neverwinter to restore the temple of their god, Neverember gave them the Hall of Justice for that purpose and moved into a private villa. This action made him even more worthy of a leader in the eyes of the Neverwintans.[8]

By 1491 DR, Neverember's efforts to rebuild the city proved successful, and Neverwinter had slowly being restored as a center of civilization on the Sword Coast North.[8]

AppendixEdit

NotesEdit

  1. As the text in the Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide is vague about her fate and is written using an unreliable narrator.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 86. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 87. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Wizards RPG Team (2014). The Rise of Tiamat. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 14–15. ISBN 978-0786965657.
  4. Erik Scott de Bie (2011). Lost Crown of Neverwinter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 5.
  5. 5.0 5.1 R.A. Salvatore (October 2010). Gauntlgrym. (Wizards of the Coast), chap. 11, pp. 166–177.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Erik Scott de Bie (2011). Lost Crown of Neverwinter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 6.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 87–91. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 51–53. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  9. Erik Scott de Bie (April 2013). Storm over Neverwinter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 3.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 140. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  11. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 138. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 Cryptic Studios (2013). Jack Emmert and Shane Hensley. NeverwinterPerfect World Entertainment.
  13. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 143. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 104. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 110. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  16. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 145. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  17. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 152–153. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 98–101. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  19. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 90–93. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  20. 20.0 20.1 Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 120. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  21. 21.0 21.1 Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 117. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  22. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 24. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  23. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 121. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  24. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 139. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  25. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 153. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  26. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 156. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  27. Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 101. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  28. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 106. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  29. 29.0 29.1 29.2 Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 117–118. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  30. 30.0 30.1 Erik Scott de Bie (2011). Lost Crown of Neverwinter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 29.
  31. 31.0 31.1 Erik Scott de Bie (2011). Gates of Neverdeath. (Wizards of the Coast).
  32. Erik Scott de Bie (2011). Lost Crown of Neverwinter. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 6–57.
  33. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 91–98. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  34. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 96–97. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  35. R.A. Salvatore (March 2014). Night of the Hunter. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 378–379. ISBN 0-7869-6511-8.
  36. Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 17–18. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  37. Erik Scott de Bie (April 2013). Storm over Neverwinter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 5.
  38. Erik Scott de Bie (April 2013). Storm over Neverwinter. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 5–37.
  39. Erik Scott de Bie (April 2013). Storm over Neverwinter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 36.
  40. Greg Bilsland, Mike Mearls (2011). Forge of the Dawn Titan. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 3–11.
  41. 41.0 41.1 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 101. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  42. Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 85. ISBN 978-0786965809.