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Pearls were not mined, they were the product of oysters or other mollusks, but they were treated like gemstones.[6][7]

DescriptionEdit

Pearls were formed of layers of tchazar (aragonite) around a bit of grit or other irritant, growing inside a mollusk over the span of a few years. This slow process gave pearls a smooth surface with a deep, rich luster.[6][7] Pearls were predominantly white but did occur in other colors such as gold, pink, or silver;[3] rainbow and black[3] being the most rare and valuable.[6][7] The unique brilliant green pearls of the emerald oyster were valued at 500 gold pieces and above.[8]

Over-sized pearls (3 in or 8 cm in diameter or more) were frequently flawed in some way and not as valuable. One exception to this was a perfect head-sized pearl that was enchanted to become a crystal ball.[6][7] A typical pearl has a base value of 100 gp[3] to 500 gp,[1][2] depending on market value.

Pearls were considered sacred by followers of Deep Sashelas and Dugmaren Brightmantle—appropriate for sacrifice, or to be consecrated for use, or recognized as boons or omens when found. Specifically, white pearls were sacred to followers of Savras, and black pearls were sacred to followers of Shargaas and Vhaeraun.[9]

PowersEdit

Pearls were used as a material component in many spells, particularly those that reduced acids to plain water, and neutralize poison. Crushed to a powder, pearls were used in creating all types of magic mirrors. Well-known magical items included the pearl of power, the pearl of the sirines and the pearl of wisdom.[7]

TriviaEdit

The lesser deity Vhaeraun was known to occasionally send black pearls to show his favour or disfavour to his followers.[10][11]

AppendixEdit

See AlsoEdit

GalleryEdit

External LinksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 137. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Ed Greenwood, Eric L. Boyd (1996). Volo's Guide to All Things Magical. (TSR, Inc), p. 127. ISBN 0-7869-0446-1.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 300. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  4. James Wyatt (June 2008). Dungeon Master's Guide 4th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 124. ISBN 978-0-7869-4880-2.
  5. Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford, Christopher Perkins, James Wyatt (2014). Dungeon Master's Guide 5th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 134. ISBN 978-0786965622.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 137–138. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 Ed Greenwood, Eric L. Boyd (1996). Volo's Guide to All Things Magical. (TSR, Inc), p. 47. ISBN 0-7869-0446-1.
  8. Ed Greenwood, Eric L. Boyd, Darrin Drader (July 2004). Serpent Kingdoms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 101. ISBN 0-7869-3277-5.
  9. Sean K. Reynolds (2002). Deity Do's and Don'ts. A Faiths and Pantheons Web Enhancement. Wizards of the Coast. pp. 11, 13, 14, 15. Retrieved on 2014-09-22.
  10. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 37. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  11. Sean K. Reynolds (2002-05-04). Deity Do's and Don'ts (Zipped PDF). Wizards of the Coast. p. 15. Retrieved on 2009-10-07.