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River Xon

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The river Xon was a river that lay along the border between Durpar and Ulgarth in southeast Faerûn.[3] To the folk of the Hordelands and followers of the Padhra, it was the Gaya, called the River of Life and the Sacred River.[5][1][2][note 1]

GeographyEdit

The Gaya was the end point of the great Jumpa River that ran through the Hordelands.[5] The Jumpa ran through the Great Pass of the Yehimal, and there joined the Gaya.[1]

As the Xon, it emerged from the Ice Peaks of the Dustwall Mountains. It ran past the Durpari city of Flyndagol on the west bank. At its mouth, it flowed into Xontuil Bay, which emptied into the Golden Water, which joined the Great Sea in the south.[3][6][note 2]

PoliticsEdit

The heavily defended and fortified border between Durpar and Ulgarth lay along the Xon.[3][7]

IndustryEdit

The river Xon was where the cosmetic fiertallin—a chalky white material—was gathered. It was exported from Suormpar, a city 20 miles (32 kilometers) down the bay. It was popular in Ulgarth.[8]

SignificanceEdit

The Gaya was sacred to followers of the Padhra in the Hordelands. Pilgrims began their journey at the mouth of the Gaya in the south and sought the Thousand Sacred Sources of the Gaya in the north, including the Dharbang, Gogrus, and Jumpa Rivers, and stopping at various sacred sites along these.[1][4][2][note 3]

AppendixEdit

NotesEdit

  1. The Gaya is not labeled on maps, but its description in The Horde compared with maps depicting the Jumpa and the Xon in The Horde and The Forgotten Realms Atlas shows that the Gaya and the Xon must be the same or very closely linked. Storm Riders describes the Gaya as emptying into the Great Sea, where the Golden Water ultimately joins, confirming the connection.
  2. The river Xon is not labeled on maps in The Forgotten Realms Atlas, but the source of the Xon in the Ice Peaks can be found by comparing with maps in The Shining South.
  3. The Gaya is likely named after Bodh Gaya, where the Buddha is said to have achieved enlightenment; the Padhra is based upon the Buddha.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 David Cook (1990). The Horde (Volume II). (TSR, Inc), pp. 63–64. ISBN 978-0880388689.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Troy Denning (1990). Storm Riders. (TSR, Inc), p. 26. ISBN 0-88038-834-X.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Tom Prusa (1993). The Shining South. (TSR, Inc), pp. 53, 73. ISBN 1-56076-595-X.
  4. 4.0 4.1 David Cook (1990). The Horde (Volume II). (TSR, Inc), pp. 39, 51. ISBN 978-0880388689.
  5. 5.0 5.1 David Cook (1990). The Horde (Map: The Horde). (TSR, Inc). ISBN 978-0880388689.
  6. Karen Wynn Fonstad (August 1990). The Forgotten Realms Atlas. (TSR, Inc), p. 11. ISBN 978-0880388573.
  7. Tom Prusa (1993). The Shining South. (TSR, Inc), p. 74. ISBN 1-56076-595-X.
  8. Tom Prusa (1993). The Shining South. (TSR, Inc), pp. 76, 78. ISBN 1-56076-595-X.

GalleryEdit

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