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Tasseldale, one of lands' trading dales, was among the wealthiest within the Dalelands,[6] having always been heavily influenced by the nation of Sembia. The land was comprised of twelve towns, or tassels, that accommodated about half of their population[1] and served as the center of their society.[2]

They were one of the southern-most located dales, and conveyed a large amount of the regions traffic along the East Way and Rauthauvyr's Road, which together connected Cormyr to Hillsfar.[2] Many other small roads criss-crossed around the Tasselway, the prominent trail that ran the length of the dale.[6]

CultureEdit

The Tassadran were by and large, craftspeople and traders,[1] contented with orderly lives and maintaining a cool-headed demeanor.[7] The craftsmen of the dale included gold, silver, pewter and tinsmiths, book-binders, wood-workers. illustrators, toy-makers and scores more.[2] The minority of their populace that were unhappy with the crafting lifestyle typically moved on to other dales or work as loggers in the Arch Wood forest.[7]

Like the rest of the Dalesfolk they were fiercely independent, and while visitors might dismiss them as money-hungry, would-be Sembians, they maintained a quiet, unassuming pride. They quietly set out to do what they thought was right.[8]

TradeEdit

The general economic dynamic of the Dalelands was each dale would produce locally-cultivated food products or harvest natural resources like timber or iron and trade them for the finished goods needed for everyday life. The opposite was true in Tasseldale. While they housed enough craftspeople to suit the needs of their populace, with enough still to export and profit, they lacked the raw materials that were so abundant in the other dales.[9]

Due to their high economic demand, Tasseldale was extremely dependent upon Sembia for success. It wasn't a one-way boon for the nation, as Tasseldale offered a quaint getaway for travel, far enough to escape the urban lifestyle of Selgaunt or Ordulin but still quite close. Despite the fears of annexation held by many Tassadran in the 14th century, the dale was considered by Sembia to be much more profitable as a neighbor, than another district.[9] This outlook proved temporary as time went on.[5]

The dale was home to a number of branches of large Sembian trading costers including the Red Wyvern Company and the Sheathed Dagger Coster, but had their own smaller competitors like the Tasselway Coster of Glaun.[9]

GovernmentEdit

Tasseldale was ruled by the Grand Mairshar, whose broad powers included law enforcement, handling foreign relations and, with consult of the Tassel Elders, writing laws and executing military action. Grand Mairshars appointed their successor upon retirement, pending approval of the elders.[2]

The Mairshar themselves served as the dale's constables, adjudicators and soldiers. From all the volunteers candidates, only a select few passed the months of assessment and years service as a cadet. In addition to their martial prowess, the Mairshar were selected for their even-tempered disposition and tempered judgement.[2]

To supplement this elite force, Tasseldale maintained an extensive militia of Tassadran that, when assembled, would fall under the command of a Mairshar.[2]

HistoryEdit

After Moondale was founded in 700 DR,[10] the forests of region receded and more dalesfolk settled in the area that would become Tasseldale around 980 DR.[2]

After Aencar Burlisk declared himself King of the Dales, Tasseldale willfully joined alongside Battledale and Shadowdale under his rule. He was beloved to the Tassadran and they saw his authority as rightfully earned.[3]

Following the murder of some Tassadran hunters within the Arch Wood in 1368, the rivalry between the loggers of Tasseldale and Archendale turned violent with the development of the game known as Woodsmen's War. This game was little more than outright violent fisticuffs between the hunters, soldiers and rowdy youth of the two dales.[7]

Despite the mutually-beneficial relationship enjoyed by both Tasseldale and Sembia throughout the 1400's[9], the mercantile nation attempted to peacefully annex Tasseldale, just as it had done with Featherdale in 1418 DR. When this didn't work, they became more aggressive and invaded the dale with mercenaries from the city of Yhaunn in 1420 DR.[4] Grand Mairshar Erich Inshiland resisted the assault, but were ultimately defeated by Sembian forces.[5]

Geographical featuresEdit

Unlike the rest of the dales, Tasseldale was a vast, flat open space ideally suited for farmlands.[7] It featured a nearly-daily morning mist that blanketed rolling grasslands with small hedgerows and thin, winding streams that all emptied into the River Ashaba.[6]

Dun Hills
These mounds seperated the dale from Battledale to the north and Deepingdale to the west. It was populated by teams of wild ponies.[7]
Glaun Bog
A dark marshland that was abundant in coal,[11] iron and home to many dangers including quicksand, carnivorous plants and will-o'-wisps.[7]

Notable locationsEdit

  • Abbey of the Just Hammer: This monastery of Tyr located in the Dun Hills emphasized the justice aspect of the deity's portfolio. They provided legal education for travelers who braved a journey to their abbey,[7] and were largely responsible for the hills being mostly free from monsters.[12]

TasselsEdit

  • Archtassel: This smaller tassel rested near the Arch Wood, south of the East Way. It was home to many loggers, woodworkers, and trappers who all earned their living from the forest. They maintained an intense rivalry with the loggers of Archendale.[13]
  • Arrowmark: A small and exceptionally quiet hamlet that was renowned for its skilled fletchers and bow-makers.[14]
  • Halfcrag: A small, easily-defensible village that rested atop a mesa isolated from the Dun Hills. They were once the largest farming settlement in all the dales.[16]
  • Moontassel: Located nearest the former-dale of Moondale, this sprawling town was full of lively street vendors, frivolous entertainment and other attractions for tourists visiting from Sembia.[17]
  • Tasselheart: This town was nestled right in the crossroads of Tasseldale and accommodated its large, Midsummer Market during the season.[14] This town full of kind, open-armed citizens expanded rapidly throughout the mid-14th century.[18]

AppendixEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 140. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 Richard Baker (1993). The Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 49. ISBN 978-1560766674.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 122. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 108. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 112. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Ed Greenwood (January 1996). Volo's Guide to the Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 199. ISBN 0-7869-0406-2.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 141. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  8. Ed Greenwood (January 1996). Volo's Guide to the Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 201. ISBN 0-7869-0406-2.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 Richard Baker (1993). The Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 50. ISBN 978-1560766674.
  10. Richard Baker (1993). The Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 59. ISBN 978-1560766674.
  11. Ed Greenwood (January 1996). Volo's Guide to the Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 200. ISBN 0-7869-0406-2.
  12. Ed Greenwood (January 1996). Volo's Guide to the Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 202. ISBN 0-7869-0406-2.
  13. Ed Greenwood (January 1996). Volo's Guide to the Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 203. ISBN 0-7869-0406-2.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 Richard Baker (1993). The Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 52. ISBN 978-1560766674.
  15. 15.0 15.1 Ed Greenwood (January 1996). Volo's Guide to the Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 207. ISBN 0-7869-0406-2.
  16. Ed Greenwood (January 1996). Volo's Guide to the Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 209. ISBN 0-7869-0406-2.
  17. Ed Greenwood (January 1996). Volo's Guide to the Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 211. ISBN 0-7869-0406-2.
  18. Ed Greenwood (January 1996). Volo's Guide to the Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 214. ISBN 0-7869-0406-2.
  19. Richard Baker (1993). The Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 51. ISBN 978-1560766674.