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Teleport was a conjuration spell that allowed the caster to transit instantly between two points.[3]

EffectEdit

This spell instantaneously transported the caster to a chosen location, up to some hundreds of miles away, but interplanar travel was impossible. The caster could take with them objects (up to a size they could carry) and willing creatures (according to their casting potency), provided they were could touch at least one of them and all were in contact.[3]

The caster had to have a clear understanding of the destination, both where it was located and its probable layout. A more accurate mental image of the destination made the teleport more likely to be successful. An area the caster was personally familiar with made the teleport almost guaranteed, but if they'd seen it only briefly, then it was much riskier. A false destination or one no longer existing guaranteed failure. Intense physical or magical energies in an area could also make a teleport more dangerous or prevent it entirely.[3]

There was a chance the caster would end up off target, that is, in a random direction and distance away that was a percentage of the distance traveled. For example, a teleport to a coastal city over hundred miles away going off-target could see the caster appearing 15 miles out to sea. Alternatively, they could arrive in an area that was only visually or thematically similar to the desired destination, usually the closest similar location or one with similar contents. For example, a failed teleport into an armory might instead put one in a nearby blacksmith's shop where weaponry was also on display. The teleport could occasionally result in a "mishap" of unfortunate scrambling, which injured or even killed the caster and companions.[3]

ConponentsEdit

The spell required only a verbal component to be cast.[2]

HistoryEdit

The spell was attributed to the Netherese arcanist Oberon in -959 DR and was originally called Oberon's teleportation.[1]

AppendixEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 slade, James Butler (November 1996). Netheril: Empire of Magic (The Winds of Netheril). (TSR, Inc.), pp. 23,27. ISBN 0-7869-0437-2.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford (2014). Player's Handbook 5th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 207,209,211,266–267. ISBN 978-0-7869-6560-1.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams (July 2003). Player's Handbook 3.5 edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 292–293. ISBN 0-7869-2886-7.
  4. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 89. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  5. David "Zeb" Cook (August 1989). Player's Handbook (2nd edition). (TSR, Inc.), p. 172. ISBN 0-88038-716-5.
  6. Richard Baker (1996). Player's Option: Spells & Magic. (TSR, Inc), p. 180. ISBN 0-7869-0394-5.
  7. Jeff Grubb and Andria Hayday (April 1992). Arabian Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 153. ISBN 978-1560763581.

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